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Private Health Investments under Competing Risks: Evidence from Malaria Control in Senegal

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  • Rossi, Pauline
  • Villar, Paola

Abstract

This study exploits the introduction of high subsidies for anti-malaria products in Senegal in 2009 to investigate whether malaria prevents parents from investing in child health. A simple model of health investments under competing mortality risks predicts that private expenses to fight malaria and other diseases should increase in response to anti-malaria public interventions. We test and validate this prediction using original panel data from a household expenditure survey combined with geographical information on malaria prevalence. We find that health expenditures in malarious regions catch up with non-malarious regions. The same result holds for parental health-seeking behavior against other diseases like diarrhea. These patterns cannot be explained by differential trends between regions. Our results suggest that behavioral responses to anti-malaria campaigns magnify their impact on all-cause mortality for children.

Suggested Citation

  • Rossi, Pauline & Villar, Paola, 2020. "Private Health Investments under Competing Risks: Evidence from Malaria Control in Senegal," CEPR Discussion Papers 14705, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:14705
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 5th October 2020
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2020-10-05 11:00:05

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Africa; Competing Risks; Health expenses; Human Capital; Malaria;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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