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Do public health interventions crowd out private health investments? Malaria control policies in Eritrea

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  • Armand, Alex
  • Carneiro, Pedro
  • Locatelli, Andrea
  • Mihreteab, Selam
  • Keating, Joseph

Abstract

Engaging in indoor residual spraying in areas with high coverage of mosquito bed nets may discourage net ownership and use. This paper analyses new data from a randomized control trial conducted in Eritrea, which surprisingly shows the opposite: indoor residual spraying encouraged net acquisition and use. One possible explanation for this finding is that there is imperfect information about the risk of malaria infection. The introduction of indoor residual spraying may have made the problem of malaria more salient, leading to a change in beliefs about its importance and to an increase in private health investments.

Suggested Citation

  • Armand, Alex & Carneiro, Pedro & Locatelli, Andrea & Mihreteab, Selam & Keating, Joseph, 2017. "Do public health interventions crowd out private health investments? Malaria control policies in Eritrea," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 107-115.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:45:y:2017:i:c:p:107-115
    DOI: 10.1016/j.labeco.2016.11.003
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    Cited by:

    1. Kate Ambler & Diego Aycinena & Dean Yang, 2015. "Channeling Remittances to Education: A Field Experiment among Migrants from El Salvador," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 207-232, April.
    2. repec:afe:journl:v:19:y:2017:i:2:p:19-32 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Gabriel Picone & Robyn Kibler & Bénédicte H. Apouey, 2013. "Malaria prevalence, indoor residual spraying, and insecticide-treated net usage in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers halshs-00911364, HAL.
    4. Pauline Rossi & Paola Villar, 2017. "Private Health Investments under Competing Risks: Evidence from Malaria Control in Senegal," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 17-108/V, Tinbergen Institute.
    5. Gabriel Picone & Robyn Kibler & Bénédicte H. Apouey, 2013. "Malaria prevalence, indoor residual spraying, and insecticide-treated net usage in Sub-Saharan Africa," PSE Working Papers halshs-00911364, HAL.
    6. Pauline Rossi & Paola Villar, 2017. "Private Health Investments under Competing Risks: Evidence from Malaria Control in Senegal," PSE Working Papers halshs-01634658, HAL.
    7. Gabriel Picone & Robyn Kibler & Bénédicte H. Apouey, 2017. "Malaria Prevalence, Indoor Residual Spraying, and Insecticide Treated Net Usage in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of African Development, African Finance and Economic Association (AFEA), vol. 19(2), pages 19-32.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Malaria; Bed nets; Indoor Residual Spray; Information; Beliefs; Behavior;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • H42 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Publicly Provided Private Goods
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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