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Understanding health behaviour changes in response to outbreaks: Findings from a longitudinal study of a large epidemic of mosquito-borne disease

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  • Raude, Jocelyn
  • MCColl, Kathleen
  • Flamand, Claude
  • Apostolidis, Themis

Abstract

Although greater attention has been recently given to the ecological determinants of health behaviours, we still do not know much about the behavioural changes induced by the spread of infectiousdiseases.

Suggested Citation

  • Raude, Jocelyn & MCColl, Kathleen & Flamand, Claude & Apostolidis, Themis, 2019. "Understanding health behaviour changes in response to outbreaks: Findings from a longitudinal study of a large epidemic of mosquito-borne disease," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 230(C), pages 184-193.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:230:y:2019:i:c:p:184-193
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.04.009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    5. Qin, Hua & Sanders, Christine & Prasetyo, Yanu & Syukron, Muh. & Prentice, Elizabeth, 2021. "Exploring the dynamic relationships between risk perception and behavior in response to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 285(C).

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