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Individuals� Preventive Behavioral Response to Changes in Malaria Risks and Government Interventions: Evidence from six African countries

Author

Listed:
  • Gabriel Picone

    (Department of Economics, University of South Florida)

  • Robyn Kibler

    (Department of Economics, University of South Florida)

  • Benedicte Apouey

    (Paris School of Economics, CNRS)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the importance of malaria prevalence, malaria ecology, and indoor residual spraying on the probability of sleeping under an insecticide-treated net (ITN) in six African countries. Using individual data on ITN usage combined with the malaria prevalence and ecology data for the area where the person lives, we show that malaria prevalence and ecology have positive effects on ITN usage. However, ITN usage is inelastic with respect to malaria prevalence, with elasticity of 0.181 for children under 5 and of 0.223 for adult women. We also find that indoor residual spraying does not crowd out ITN usage.

Suggested Citation

  • Gabriel Picone & Robyn Kibler & Benedicte Apouey, 2013. "Individuals� Preventive Behavioral Response to Changes in Malaria Risks and Government Interventions: Evidence from six African countries," Working Papers 0313, University of South Florida, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:usf:wpaper:0313
    as

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    File URL: https://www.usf.edu/arts-sciences/departments/economics/documents/picone_prevalence.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Malaria prevalence elasticity; ITN usage; public intervations;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • H4 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods

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