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The Value of Vaccination

Author

Listed:
  • David E. Bloom
  • David Canning
  • Mark Weston

Abstract

Despite advances during the twentieth century, immunization coverage is far from universal and faces significant obstacles in both developing and developed countries. Weak policy emphasis on vaccination may be the result of the narrow view of its benefits in scientific and policy-making communities, which focus mainly on the averted costs of medical treatment. An investigation of the broader impacts of immunization shows that the benefits of vaccine programs—in particular, their economic effects via improved health—have been underestimated, thereby causing the rate of return to be underestimated.

Suggested Citation

  • David E. Bloom & David Canning & Mark Weston, 2005. "The Value of Vaccination," World Economics, World Economics, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 6(3), pages 15-39, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:wej:wldecn:213
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lazuka, Volha, 2017. "Infant health and later-life labour market outcomes : Evidence from the introduction of sulfa antibiotics in Sweden," Lund Papers in Economic History 154, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    2. David Cutler & Angus Deaton & Adriana Lleras-Muney, 2006. "The Determinants of Mortality," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(3), pages 97-120, Summer.
    3. Pronker, Esther & Weenen, Tamar & Commandeur, Harry & Claassen, E. & Osterhaus, A.D.M.E., 2015. "Scratching the surface: Exploratory analysis of key opinion leaders on rate limiting factors in novel adjuvanted-vaccine development," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 90(PB), pages 420-432.
    4. David E. Bloom & David Canning & Erica S. Shenoy, 2012. "The effect of vaccination on children's physical and cognitive development in the Philippines," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(21), pages 2777-2783, July.
    5. Dean Jamison & Prabhat Jha & David E. Bloom, 2008. "Disease Control," PGDA Working Papers 3508, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
    6. repec:eee:wdevel:v:103:y:2018:i:c:p:88-99 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Santosh, Kumar, 2009. "Fertility and Birth Spacing Consequences of Childhood Immunization Program: Evidence from India," MPRA Paper 27126, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. J. Driessen & A. Razzaque & D. Walker & D. Canning, 2015. "The effect of childhood measles vaccination on school enrolment in Matlab, Bangladesh," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(55), pages 6019-6040, November.
    9. Busso, Matias & Cristia, Julian & Humpage, Sarah, 2015. "Did you get your shots? Experimental evidence on the role of reminders," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 226-237.
    10. Agenor, Pierre-Richard & Moreno-Dodson, Blanca, 2006. "Public infrastructure and growth : new channels and policy implications," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4064, The World Bank.
    11. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Canuto, Otaviano & da Silva, Luiz Pereira, 2014. "On gender and growth: The role of intergenerational health externalities and women's occupational constraints," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 132-147.
    12. David E Bloom & David Canning, 2006. "Global Demography: Fact, Force and Future," RBA Annual Conference Volume,in: Christopher Kent & Anna Park & Daniel Rees (ed.), Demography and Financial Markets Reserve Bank of Australia.
    13. Canning, David & Razzaque, Abdur & Driessen, Julia & Walker, Damian G. & Streatfield, Peter Kim & Yunus, Mohammad, 2011. "The effect of maternal tetanus immunization on children's schooling attainment in Matlab, Bangladesh: Follow-up of a randomized trial," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 72(9), pages 1429-1436, May.
    14. Busso, Matias & Cristia, Julian & Humpage, Sarah, 2015. "Did you get your shots? Experimental evidence on the role of reminders," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 226-237.
    15. Edith Maes & Rutger Daems, 2011. "Perspectives on Public Private Partnership: The R&D Based Vaccine Industry," Working Papers 2011/36, Maastricht School of Management.
    16. Cristia, Julian & Prado, Ariadna García & Peluffo, Cecilia, 2015. "The Impact of Contracting in and Contracting out Basic Health Services: The Guatemalan Experience," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 215-227.
    17. Santosh, Kumar, 2009. "Childhood Immunization, Mortality and Human Capital Accumulation: Micro-Evidence from India," MPRA Paper 27127, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Driessen, Julia & Olson, Zachary D. & Jamison, Dean T. & Verguet, Stéphane, 2015. "Comparing the health and social protection effects of measles vaccination strategies in Ethiopia: An extended cost-effectiveness analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 139(C), pages 115-122.
    19. McGovern, Mark E. & Canning, David, 2015. "Vaccination and All Cause Child Mortality 1985-2011: Global Evidence from the Demographic and Health Surveys," Working Paper 227741, Harvard University OpenScholar.

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