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The effect of vaccination on children's physical and cognitive development in the Philippines

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  • David E. Bloom
  • David Canning
  • Erica S. Shenoy

Abstract

We use data from the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey (CLHNS) in the Philippines to link vaccination in the first 2 years of life with later physical and cognitive development in children. We use propensity score matching to estimate the causal effect of vaccination on child development. We find no effect of vaccination on later height or weight, but full childhood vaccination for measles, polio, Tuberculosis (TB), Diphtheria, Pertussis and Tetanus (DPT) significantly increases cognitive test scores relative to matched children who received no vaccinations. The size of the effect is large, raising test scores, on average, by about half an SD.

Suggested Citation

  • David E. Bloom & David Canning & Erica S. Shenoy, 2012. "The effect of vaccination on children's physical and cognitive development in the Philippines," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(21), pages 2777-2783, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:44:y:2012:i:21:p:2777-2783
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2011.566203
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Butikofer, Aline & Løken, Katrine & Salvanes, Kjell G, 2016. "Infant Health Care and Long-Term Outcomes," CEPR Discussion Papers 11652, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Bütikofer, Aline & Loken, Katrine Vellesen & Salvanes, Kjell G., 2015. "Long-Term Consequences of Access to Well-Child Visits," IZA Discussion Papers 9546, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. J. Driessen & A. Razzaque & D. Walker & D. Canning, 2015. "The effect of childhood measles vaccination on school enrolment in Matlab, Bangladesh," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(55), pages 6019-6040, November.
    4. Steve Brito & Ana Corbacho & Rene Osorio, 2017. "Does birth under-registration reduce childhood immunization? Evidence from the Dominican Republic," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 1-18, December.
    5. McGovern, Mark E. & Canning, David, 2015. "Vaccination and All Cause Child Mortality 1985-2011: Global Evidence from the Demographic and Health Surveys," Working Paper 227741, Harvard University OpenScholar.

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