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Can Nutritional Label Use Influence Body Weight Outcomes?

Author

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  • Andreas C. Drichoutis
  • Rodolfo M. Nayga, Jr.
  • Panagiotis Lazaridis

Abstract

Many countries around the world have already mandated, or plan to mandate, the presence of nutrition related information on most pre-packaged food products. Health advocates and lobbyists would like to see similar laws mandating nutrition information in the restaurant and fast-food market as well. In fact, New York City has already taken a step forward and now requires all chain restaurants with 15 or more establishments anywhere in US to show calorie information on their menus and menu board. The benefits were estimated to be as much as 150,000 fewer obese New Yorkers over the next five years. Copyright 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Andreas C. Drichoutis & Rodolfo M. Nayga, Jr. & Panagiotis Lazaridis, 2009. "Can Nutritional Label Use Influence Body Weight Outcomes?," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(4), pages 500-525, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:kyklos:v:62:y:2009:i:4:p:500-525
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ran, Tao & Yue, Chengyan & Rihn, Alicia, 2015. "Are Grocery Shoppers of Households with Weight-Concerned Members Willing to Pay More for Nutrtional Information on Food?," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 46(3), November.
    2. Georgia S. Papoutsi & Andreas C. Drichoutis & Rodolfo M. Nayga Jr., 2013. "The Causes Of Childhood Obesity: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(4), pages 743-767, September.
    3. Berning, Joshua P. & Chouinard, Hayley H. & Manning, Kenneth C. & McCluskey, Jill J. & Sprott, David E., 2010. "Identifying consumer preferences for nutrition information on grocery store shelf labels," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 429-436, October.
    4. Schroeter, Christiane & Anders, Sven M., 2013. "Nutrition Label Usage, Diet Health Behavior, and Information Uncertainty," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 151214, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Giorgio Brunello & Maria De Paola & Giovanna Labartino, 2012. "More Apples Less Chips? The Effect of School Fruit Schemes on the Consumption of Junk Food," ISER Discussion Paper 0840, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    6. Chang, Hung-Hao & Nayga Jr., Rodolfo M., 2011. "Mother's nutritional label use and children's body weight," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 171-178, April.
    7. House, Lisa & Kim, Hyeyoung & Gao, Zhifeng & Rampersaud, Gail S., 2011. "Beverage Front of Package Nutrition Labels and Consumer Perception of Nutrition Information," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 109190, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Brunello, Giorgio & De Paola, Maria & Labartino, Giovanna, 2014. "More apples fewer chips? The effect of school fruit schemes on the consumption of junk food," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 118(1), pages 114-126.
    9. Vinoles, Maria V. & You, Wen & Nayga, Rodolfo M. Jr., 2013. "Parental Nutrition Label Usage and Children's Dietary-related Outcomes," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 151274, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    10. Anders, Sven & Schroeter, Christiane, 2015. "The Impact of Nutritional Supplement Choices on Diet Behavior and Obesity Outcomes," 2016 Allied Social Science Association (ASSA) Annual Meeting, January 3-5, 2016, San Francisco, California 212806, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    11. L. Behrenz & L. Delander & J. MÃ¥nsson, 2016. "Is Starting a Business a Sustainable way out of Unemployment? Treatment Effects of the Swedish Start-up Subsidy," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 389-411, December.
    12. Ehmke, Mariah D. & Willson, Tina M. & Schroeter, Christiane & Hart, Ann Marie & Coupal, Roger H., 2009. "Obesity Economics for the Western United States," Western Economics Forum, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 8(02).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General

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