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Identifying consumer preferences for nutrition information on grocery store shelf labels

  • Berning, Joshua P.
  • Chouinard, Hayley H.
  • Manning, Kenneth C.
  • McCluskey, Jill J.
  • Sprott, David E.

Nutrition labels can potentially benefit consumers by increasing product knowledge and reducing search costs. However, the global increase in obesity rates leads one to question the effectiveness of current nutrition information formats. Alternative formats for providing nutrition information may be more effective. Shoppers at a major grocery chain participated in choice experiments designed to identify preferences for nutrition information provided on grocery store shelf labels. Shoppers demonstrate a strong affinity for shelf-label nutrition information and the presentation of the nutrition information significantly affects their preferences as well. Several demographic variables help to explain differences in preferences.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VCB-509Y4F1-1/2/42e50862ac8c27df4d9fbf2217717d5b
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Food Policy.

Volume (Year): 35 (2010)
Issue (Month): 5 (October)
Pages: 429-436

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:35:y:2010:i:5:p:429-436
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodpol

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  8. Wansink, Brian & Sonka, Steven T. & Hasler, Clare M., 2004. "Front-label health claims: when less is more," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 659-667, December.
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  10. Kim, Sung-Yong & Nayga, Rodolfo M., Jr. & Capps, Oral, Jr., 2001. "Health Knowledge And Consumer Use Of Nutritional Labels: The Issue Revisited," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 30(1), April.
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