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Identifying Consumer Preferences for Nutrition Information on Grocery Store Shelf Labels

Author

Listed:
  • Berning, Joshua P.
  • Chouinard, Hayley
  • Manning, Kenneth
  • McCluskey, Jill J.
  • Sprott, David

Abstract

Nutrition labels can potentially benefit consumers by increasing product knowledge and reducing search costs. However, the global increase in obesity rates leads one to question the effectiveness of current nutrition information formats. Alternative formats for providing nutrition information may be more effective. Shoppers at a major grocery chain participated in choice experiments designed to identify preferences for nutrition information provided on grocery store shelf labels. Shoppers demonstrate a strong affinity for shelf label nutrition information and the presentation of the nutrition information significantly affects their preferences as well. Several demographic variables help to explain differences in preferences.

Suggested Citation

  • Berning, Joshua P. & Chouinard, Hayley & Manning, Kenneth & McCluskey, Jill J. & Sprott, David, 2009. "Identifying Consumer Preferences for Nutrition Information on Grocery Store Shelf Labels," Research Reports 149962, University of Connecticut, Food Marketing Policy Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uconnr:149962
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Zhu, Chen & Huang, Rui, 2014. "Heterogeneity in Consumer Responses to Front-of-Package Nutrition Labels: Evidence from a Natural Experiment?," Working Papers 27, University of Connecticut, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Charles J. Zwick Center for Food and Resource Policy.
    2. Allais, Olivier & Etilé, Fabrice & Lecocq, Sébastien, 2015. "Mandatory labels, taxes and market forces: An empirical evaluation of fat policies," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 27-44.
    3. Loureiro, Maria L. & Rahmani, Djamal, 2013. "Calorie labeling and fast food choices in surveys and actual markets: some new behavioral results," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150622, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. Cavaliere, Alessia & De Marchi, Elisa & Banterle, Alessandro, 2013. "Time Preference and Health: The Problem of Obesity," 2013 International European Forum, February 18-22, 2013, Innsbruck-Igls, Austria 164754, International European Forum on Innovation and System Dynamics in Food Networks.
    5. Cam Hebda & Jeffrey Wagner, 2016. "Nudging healthy food consumption and sustainability in food deserts," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 57-71, March.
    6. Wang, Emily Y. & Wei, Hongli & Caswell, Julie A., 2016. "The impact of mandatory trans fat labeling on product mix and consumer choice: A longitudinal analysis of the U.S. Market for margarine and spreads," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 63-81.
    7. Berning, Joshua P. & Sprott, David E., 2011. "Examining the Effectiveness of Nutrition Information in a Simulated Shopping Environment," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 42(3), November.
    8. Jeremy Kees & Marla B. Royne & Yoon-Na Cho, 2014. "Regulating Front-of-Package Nutrition Information Disclosures: A Test of Industry Self-Regulation vs. Other Popular Options," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1), pages 147-174, March.
    9. Latacz-Lohmann, Uwe & Schulz, Norbert & Breustedt, Gunnar, 2014. "Assessing Farmers' Willingness to Accept "Greening": Insights from a Discrete Choice Experiment in Gremany," 88th Annual Conference, April 9-11, 2014, AgroParisTech, Paris, France 170560, Agricultural Economics Society.
    10. Loureiro, Maria L. & Rahmani, Djamel, 2016. "The incidence of calorie labeling on fast food choices: A comparison between stated preferences and actual choices," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 82-93.
    11. Yang, Shang-Ho & Monteiro, Diogo Souza & Chan, Mei-Yen & Woods, Timothy A., 2016. "Preferences for Meat Labeling in Taiwanese Traditional Markets: What do Consumers Want?," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 47(1), March.
    12. Yang, Shang-Ho & Souza Monteiro, Diogo, 2016. "What’s in a Price? The Impact of Starting Point Bias in WTP for Information in Taiwanese Wet Markets," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235766, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    13. repec:eee:socmed:v:192:y:2017:i:c:p:18-27 is not listed on IDEAS

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