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Accounting for Remittance and Migration Effects on Children's Schooling

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  • Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina
  • Pozo, Susan

Abstract

Summary We examine the impact of remittances on children's school attendance in the Dominican Republic. To isolate the effect of remittances from the effect of sometimes concurrent household out-migration, we focus on children in households without members currently residing in the United States. While girls' school attendance rises with the receipt of remittances, secondary school-age children and younger siblings are the ones who most decidedly gain from remittances. Additionally, we find that migration negatively impacts the school attendance of children as it eliminates the positive effect of remittances when we expand the sample to include children in households with members residing abroad.

Suggested Citation

  • Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Pozo, Susan, 2010. "Accounting for Remittance and Migration Effects on Children's Schooling," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(12), pages 1747-1759, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:38:y:2010:i:12:p:1747-1759
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Feng Hu, 2013. "Does migration benefit the schooling of children left behind?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(2), pages 33-70, July.
    2. Matloob Piracha & Amrita Saraogi, 2012. "The Determinants of Remittances: Evidence from Moldova," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(4), pages 467-491, December.
    3. Yiwen Chen & Benteng Zou, 2016. "To Migrate With or Without the Children—A Theoretical Note," CREA Discussion Paper Series 16-21, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    4. Berlinschi, Ruxanda & Schokkaert, Jeroen & Swinnen, Johan, 2013. "When drains and gains coincide: Migration and international football performance," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 1-14.
    5. Zhao, Qiran & Yu, Xiaohua & Wang, Xiaobing & Glauben, Thomas, 2014. "The impact of parental migration on children's school performance in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 43-54.
    6. Jamal Bouoiyour, Amal Miftah, 2015. "Migration, remittances and educational levels of household members left behind: Evidence from rural Morocco," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 12(1), pages 21-40, July.
    7. Sanjaya DeSilva, 2013. "Long-Term Benefits from Temporary Migration: Does the Gender of the Migrant Matter?," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_756, Levy Economics Institute.
    8. Delphine Boutin, 2011. "Envoi de fonds et allocation du temps des enfants au Niger : L’effet indirect des chocs négatifs," Larefi Working Papers 1105, Larefi, Université Bordeaux 4.
    9. Bouoiyour, Jamal & Miftah, Amal & Mouhoud, El Mouhoub, 2016. "Education, male gender preference and migrants' remittances: Interactions in rural Morocco," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 324-331.
    10. Luis Arango & Dolores Mata & Nataly Obando, 2015. "Echoes of the crises in Spain and US in the Colombian labor market: a differences-in-differences approach," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 441-477, November.
    11. Davis, Jason & Brazil, Noli, 2016. "Disentangling fathers’ absences from household remittances in international migration: The case of educational attainment in Guatemala," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 1-11.
    12. Yiwen Chen & Benteng Zou, 2017. "To Migrate With orWithout the Children—A Theoretical Note," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 37(2), pages 686-696.
    13. repec:laf:wpaper:201105 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Salas, Vania B., 2014. "International Remittances and Human Capital Formation," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 224-237.
    15. Ibrahim Sirkeci & Jeffrey H. Cohen & Dilip Ratha, 2012. "Migration and Remittances during the Global Financial Crisis and Beyond," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13092.
    16. Leonardo Bonilla Mejía, 2016. "Choques externos y remesas internacionales en las regiones de Colombia," Documentos de trabajo sobre Economía Regional y Urbana 250, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    17. Koska, Onur A. & Saygin, Perihan Özge & Çağatay, Selim & Artal-Tur, Andrés, 2013. "International migration, remittances, and the human capital formation of Egyptian children," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 38-50.
    18. Sami Ullah Khan & Muhammad Jehangir Khan, 2016. "The Impact of Remittances on Child Education in Pakistan," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 21(1), pages 69-98, Jan-June.
    19. Delphine Boutin, 2011. "Envoi de fonds et allocation du temps des enfants au Niger : L'effet indirect des chocs négatifs," Working Papers hal-00637607, HAL.
    20. J. Atsu Amegashie & Michael Batu, 2015. "Wider Boundaries: The Welfare State and International Remittances," CESifo Working Paper Series 5456, CESifo Group Munich.
    21. repec:eee:injoed:v:55:y:2017:i:c:p:11-16 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. DELOGU Marco & DOCQUIER Frédéric & MACHADO Joël, 2017. "Globalizing labor and the world economy: the role of human capital," LISER Working Paper Series 2017-16, LISER.
    23. Lara, Jaime, 2015. "International migration and human capital in Mexico: Networks or parental absence?," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 131-142.
    24. Fransen, Sonja & Mazzucato, Valentina, 2014. "Remittances and Household Wealth after Conflict: A Case Study on Urban Burundi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 57-68.
    25. World Bank, 2015. "Tanzania Poverty Assessment," World Bank Other Operational Studies 21871, The World Bank.

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