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Birth Order, Child Labor, and School Attendance in Brazil

  • Emerson, Patrick M.
  • Souza, André Portela

Summary This paper examines the effects of birth order on intra-household allocations as evidenced by the child labor incidence and school attendance of Brazilian children. Previous studies have found that earlier born children may have more intra-household resources directed to them, and better outcomes as adults. In the context of child labor, the effects of birth order can be confounded by the fact that earlier born children are able to command higher wages than their younger siblings. Empirical results show that, in fact, male and female first-born children are less likely to attend school than their later born siblings and male last-born children are less likely to work as child laborers than their earlier born siblings.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VC6-4SWG0MJ-1/2/e2d9afa3ba02f0f3d16880fe690fc0fc
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 36 (2008)
Issue (Month): 9 (September)
Pages: 1647-1664

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:36:y:2008:i:9:p:1647-1664
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

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  17. de Janvry, Alain & Finan, Frederico & Sadoulet, Elisabeth & Vakis, Renos, 2006. "Can conditional cash transfer programs serve as safety nets in keeping children at school and from working when exposed to shocks?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 349-373, April.
  18. Rosenzweig, Mark R. & Schultz, T. Paul, 1987. "Fertility and Investments in Human Capital: Estimates of the Consequences of Imperfect Fertility Control in Malaysia," Bulletins 7513, University of Minnesota, Economic Development Center.
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  20. Ranjula Bali Swain, 2002. "Credit Rationing In Rural India," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 27(2), pages 1-20, December.
  21. André Portela Souza, 2007. "Child Labor, School Attendance, and Intrahousehold Gender Bias in Brazil," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 21(2), pages 301-316, March.
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