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A social stigma model of child labor


  • Luis Felipe López Calva

    (El Colegio de México)


This paper constructs a model in which a social norm is internalized. The social disapproval of people who violate the norm -stigmatization-- is incorporated as a reduction in their utility. That reduction in utility is lower as the proportion of the population that violates the norm increases. In the model, society disapproves of people sending their children to work and parents care about that “embarrassment”. An equilibrium is constructed in which the expected and realized stigma costs are the same; and the wages rates of child and adult labor are such as to equate demand and supply for each kind of labor.

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  • Luis Felipe López Calva, 2002. "A social stigma model of child labor," Estudios Económicos, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, vol. 17(2), pages 193-217.
  • Handle: RePEc:emx:esteco:v:17:y:2002:i:2:p:193-217

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Holger Strulik, 2013. "School Attendance And Child Labor—A Model Of Collective Behavior," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 11(2), pages 246-277, April.
    2. Dessy, Sylvain E. & Pallage, Stephane, 2001. "Child labor and coordination failures," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 469-476, August.
    3. Fabre, Alice & Pallage, Stéphane, 2015. "Child labor, idiosyncratic shocks, and social policy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 394-411.
    4. Sahana Roy Chowdhury, 2015. "Recession and Child Labor: A Theoretical Analysis," Working Papers id:7127, eSocialSciences.
    5. Stéphane Pallage & Alice Fabre, 2010. "Child Labor and Aggregate Fluctuations," 2010 Meeting Papers 1037, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. Basu, Kaushik, 2002. "A note on multiple general equilibria with child labor," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 301-308, February.
    7. Emerson, Patrick M. & Souza, André Portela, 2008. "Birth Order, Child Labor, and School Attendance in Brazil," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 1647-1664, September.
    8. Sen, Gitanjali, 2002. "Considering the effects of poverty and schooling returns on child labour in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 17393, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Goto, Hideaki, 2011. "Social norms, inequality and child labor," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 806-814.

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