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Favorite son? Specialized child laborers and students in poor LDC households


  • Horowitz, Andrew W.
  • Wang, Jian


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  • Horowitz, Andrew W. & Wang, Jian, 2004. "Favorite son? Specialized child laborers and students in poor LDC households," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(2), pages 631-642, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:73:y:2004:i:2:p:631-642

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Chernichovsky, Dov, 1985. "Socioeconomic and Demographic Aspects of School Enrollment and Attendance in Rural Botswana," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 319-332, January.
    2. Kaushik Basu, 1999. "Child Labor: Cause, Consequence, and Cure, with Remarks on International Labor Standards," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(3), pages 1083-1119, September.
    3. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy & Robert Tamura, 1994. "Human Capital, Fertility, and Economic Growth," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 323-350 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Rosen, Sherwin, 1997. "Manufactured Inequality," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(2), pages 189-196, April.
    5. Jean-Marie Baland & James A. Robinson, 2000. "Is Child Labor Inefficient?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(4), pages 663-679, August.
    6. Dahan, Momi & Gaviria, Alejandro, 2003. "Parental actions and sibling inequality," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 281-297, October.
    7. Basu, Kaushik & Van, Pham Hoang, 1998. "The Economics of Child Labor," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 412-427, June.
    8. Tamura, Robert, 1994. "Fertility, Human Capital and the Wealth of Families," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 4(4), pages 593-603, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Patrick M. Emerson & Vladimir Ponczek & André Portela Souza, 2017. "Child Labor and Learning," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65(2), pages 265-296.
    2. Tsukada, Raquel, 2011. "The First Born Burden," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 77, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    3. Beegle, Kathleen & Dehejia, Rajeev H. & Gatti, Roberta & Krutikova, Sofya, 2008. "The consequences of child labor : evidence from longitudinal data in rural Tanzania," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4677, The World Bank.
    4. Khanam, Rasheda & Rahman, Mohammad Mafizur, 2005. "Child Work and Schooling in Bangladesh: The Role of Birth Order," MPRA Paper 8009, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Patrick M. Emerson & André Portela Souza, 2011. "Is Child Labor Harmful? The Impact of Working Earlier in Life on Adult Earnings," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(2), pages 345-385.
    6. Alok Kumar & Emma Underhill, 2014. "Gender Bias and Child Labor in LDCs," Department Discussion Papers 1402, Department of Economics, University of Victoria.
    7. Connie Bayudan-Dacuycuy, 2013. "The Influence of Living with Parents on Women's Decision-Making Participation in the Household: Evidence from the Southern Philippines," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(5), pages 641-656, May.
    8. Kathleen Beegle & Rajeev Dehejia & Roberta Gatti, 2009. "Why Should We Care About Child Labor?: The Education, Labor Market, and Health Consequences of Child Labor," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(4).
    9. Piza, Caio & Souza, André Portela Fernandes de, 2016. "Short and long-term effects of a child-labor ban," Textos para discussão 428, FGV/EESP - Escola de Economia de São Paulo, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
    10. Emerson, Patrick M. & Souza, André Portela, 2008. "Birth Order, Child Labor, and School Attendance in Brazil," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 1647-1664, September.
    11. Kumar, Alok, 2013. "Preference based vs. market based discrimination: Implications for gender differentials in child labor and schooling," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 64-68.
    12. Horowitz, Andrew W. & Souza, André Portela, 2011. "The impact of parental income on the intra-household distribution of school attainment: A measurement strategy and evidence," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 1-18, February.
    13. Mazzutti, Caio Cícero Toledo Piza da Costa, 2016. "Three essays on the causal impacts of child labour laws in Brazil," Economics PhD Theses 0616, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    14. Sen, Gitanjali, 2002. "Considering the effects of poverty and schooling returns on child labour in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 17393, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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