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Siblings, child labor, and schooling in Nicaragua and Guatemala

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  • Ana Dammert

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  • Ana Dammert, 2010. "Siblings, child labor, and schooling in Nicaragua and Guatemala," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(1), pages 199-224, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:23:y:2010:i:1:p:199-224 DOI: 10.1007/s00148-008-0237-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Eric Edmonds, 2007. "Child Labor," Working Papers id:988, eSocialSciences.
    2. Heady, Christopher, 2003. "The Effect of Child Labor on Learning Achievement," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 385-398, February.
    3. Sandra E. Black & Paul J. Devereux & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2005. "The More the Merrier? The Effect of Family Size and Birth Order on Children's Education," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, pages 669-700.
    4. Mark R. Rosenzweig & Junsen Zhang, 2009. "Do Population Control Policies Induce More Human Capital Investment? Twins, Birth Weight and China's "One-Child" Policy," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 76(3), pages 1149-1174.
    5. T. Paul Schultz, 2007. "Fertility in Developing Countries," Working Papers 953, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    6. Edmonds, Eric V., 2008. "Child Labor," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
    7. Jonathan Morduch, 2000. "Sibling Rivalry in Africa," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 405-409.
    8. Victoria Gunnarsson & Peter F. Orazem & Mario A. Sánchez, 2006. "Child Labor and School Achievement in Latin America," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 20(1), pages 31-54.
    9. Jean-Marie Baland & James A. Robinson, 2000. "Is Child Labor Inefficient?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(4), pages 663-679, August.
    10. Emerson, Patrick M. & Souza, André Portela, 2008. "Birth Order, Child Labor, and School Attendance in Brazil," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 1647-1664, September.
    11. George Psacharopoulos & Harry Anthony Patrinos, 1997. "Family size, schooling and child labor in Peru - An empirical analysis," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 387-405.
    12. Blunch,Niels-Hugo & Verner,Dorte, 2000. "Revisiting the link between poverty and child labor - the Ghanaian experience," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2488, The World Bank.
    13. Mette Ejrnæs & Claus C. Pörtner, 2004. "Birth Order and the Intrahousehold Allocation of Time and Education," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, pages 1008-1019.
    14. Basu, Kaushik & Van, Pham Hoang, 1998. "The Economics of Child Labor," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 412-427.
    15. Beegle, Kathleen & Dehejia, Rajeev H. & Gatti, Roberta, 2006. "Child labor and agricultural shocks," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 80-96.
    16. Hallman, Kelly & Quisumbing, Agnes R & Ruel, Marie & de la Briere, Benedicte, 2005. "Mothers' Work and Child Care: Findings from the Urban Slums of Guatemala City," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(4), pages 855-885, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Akresh, Richard & Edmonds, Eric V., 2010. "The Analytical Returns to Measuring a Detailed Household Roster," IZA Discussion Papers 4759, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Richard Akresh & Emilie Bagby & Damien de Walque & Harounan Kazianga, 2012. "Child Labor, Schooling, and Child Ability (Presentation)," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 3a260bbbddf24704a8a35fce7, Mathematica Policy Research.
    3. Eiji Yamamura, 2015. "Effects of Siblings and Birth Order on Income Redistribution Preferences: Evidence Based on Japanese General Social Survey," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, pages 589-606.
    4. Richard Akresh & Emilie Bagby & Damien de Walque & Harounan Kazianga, "undated". "Child Labor, Schooling, and Child Ability (Professional Paper)," Mathematica Policy Research Reports bac9373fb1b34111a24aa3147, Mathematica Policy Research.
    5. Akresh, Richard & Bagby, Emilie & de Walque, Damien & Kazianga, Harounan, 2012. "Child labor, schooling, and child ability," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5965, The World Bank.
    6. Richard de Groot & Sudhanshu Handa & Mike Park & Robert D. Osei & Isaac Osei-Akoto & Luigi Peter Ragno & Garima Bhalla, 2015. "Heterogeneous impacts of an unconditioal cash transfer programme on schooling: evidence from the Ghana LEAP programme," Papers inwopa793, Innocenti Working Papers.
    7. Richard Akresh & Emilie Bagby & Damien de Walque & Harounan Kazianga, 2012. "Child Ability and Household Human Capital Investment Decisions in Burkina Faso," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 61(1), pages 157-186.
    8. Joyce Chen, 2012. "Dads, disease, and death: determinants of daughter discrimination," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(1), pages 119-149, January.
    9. Burhan, Nik Ahmad Sufian & Sidek, Abdul Halim & Ibrahim, Saifuzzaman, 2016. "Eradicating the Crime of Child Labour in Africa: The Roles of Income, Schooling, Fertility, and Foreign Direct Investment," MPRA Paper 77250, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Ann Vogel & Kim Korinek, 2012. "Passing by the Girls? Remittance Allocation for Educational Expenditures and Social Inequality in Nepal’s Households 2003–2004," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(1), pages 61-100, March.
    11. Tien Manh Vu, 2012. "Are daughters always the losers in the chore war? Evidence using household and twin data from Vietnam," OSIPP Discussion Paper 12E002, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
    12. Richard Akresh & Eric V. Edmonds, 2011. "Residential Rivalry and Constraints on the Availability of Child Labor," NBER Working Papers 17165, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Zeng, Wu & Undurraga, Eduardo A. & Eisenberg, Dan T.A. & Rubio-Jovel, Karla & Reyes-García, Victoria & Godoy, Ricardo, 2012. "Sibling composition and child educational attainment: Evidence from native Amazonians in Bolivia," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 1017-1027.
    14. Yamamura, Eiji, 2012. "Effects of siblings and birth order on income redistribution preferences," MPRA Paper 38658, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child labor; Siblings; Gender; J13; O15;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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