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Buying Out Child Labor?

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Abstract

In this paper we view child labor as a negative externality exerted by some poor countries on richer nations. The practice of child labor can thus be used by the poor to extract some form of compensation over time. We build a two-country growth model with international externality. We then calibrate our model to the United States and a poor country, solve it numerically and provide a quantitative description of the minimum transfers necessary to induce the poor to give up child labor. We then check their sustainability from the point of view of the rich. This is one of the first attempts at quantifying a moral issue. Dans ce papier, nous considérons le travail des enfants comme une externalité négative exercée par quelques pays pauvres sur les nations plus riches. La pratique du travail des enfants peut donc être utilisée par les pauvres pour extraire une forme de compensation à travers le temps. Nous construisons un modèle de croissance à deux pays avec une externalité internationale. Ensuite, nous étalonnons notre modèle aux Etats-Unis et un pays pauvre, le résolvons numériquement et donnons une description quantitative des transfers minimaux nécessaires pour inciter les pauvres à abandonner le travail des enfants. Puis nous vérifions la soutenabilité du point de vue des riches. Ceci est une des premières tentatives de quantifier un problème moral.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephane Pallage & Christian Zimmermann, 2000. "Buying Out Child Labor?," Cahiers de recherche CREFE / CREFE Working Papers 123, CREFE, Université du Québec à Montréal.
  • Handle: RePEc:cre:crefwp:123
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Matthias Doepke, "undated". "Origins and Consequences of Child Labor Restrictions: A Macroeconomic Perspective," UCLA Economics Online Papers 413, UCLA Department of Economics.
    2. Dasgupta, Basab & Zimmermann, Christian, 2012. "Loan Regulation and Child Labor in Rural India," IZA Discussion Papers 6979, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Dessy, Sylvain E. & Pallage, Stephane, 2001. "Child labor and coordination failures," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 469-476.
    4. Sylvain Dessy & Stephane Pallage, 2001. "Why Banning the Worst Forms of Child Labour Would Hurt Poor Countries," Cahiers de recherche CREFE / CREFE Working Papers 135, CREFE, Université du Québec à Montréal.
    5. Fabre, Alice & Pallage, Stéphane, 2015. "Child labor, idiosyncratic shocks, and social policy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, pages 394-411.
    6. Dessy, Sylvain E. & Pallage, Stephane, 2001. "Child labor and coordination failures," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 469-476.
    7. Eskander, Shaikh M.S.U. & Barbier, Edward B., 2017. "Tenure Security, Human Capital and Soil Conservation in an Overlapping Generation Rural Economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 176-185.
    8. Basab Dasgupta, 2005. "Liquidity Constraint and Child Labor In India: Is Market Really Incapable Of Eradicating It From Wage-Labor Households?," Working papers 2005-37, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    9. Eskander, Shaikh M.S.U & Barbier, Edward B., 2015. "Tenure security and soil conservation in an overlapping generation rural economy," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205225, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    10. Dirk Krueger & Jessica Tjornhom Donohue, 2005. "On The Distributional Consequences Of Child Labor Legislation," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(3), pages 785-815, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child labor; poverty trap; international transfers;

    JEL classification:

    • D90 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - General
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General

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