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Born to be more educated? Birth order and schooling

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  • Young-Joo Kim

    (Hongik University)

Abstract

In this study, I investigate the effect of birth order on schooling and its evolution over time. Using a rich dataset of siblings from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, I find that for both men and women, older siblings are likely to obtain more schooling than their younger siblings. I also find that the magnitude of the birth order effect is similar across two generations but find no evidence of inheritability of the birth order effect from parents to children. In an effort to disclose possible mechanisms for the observed birth order effects, I further examine how birth order is associated with various intermediate outcomes and the parental environment during the high school years, since it is circumstances during these years that best predict whether a person receives a college education. I find that parental expectations, children’s own attitudes, academic performances and IQ scores in high school are significantly associated with birth order in ways that favor the first child.

Suggested Citation

  • Young-Joo Kim, 2020. "Born to be more educated? Birth order and schooling," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 165-180, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:18:y:2020:i:1:d:10.1007_s11150-019-09462-1
    DOI: 10.1007/s11150-019-09462-1
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    Cited by:

    1. Kim, Jun Hyung & Wang, Shaoda, 2021. "Birth Order Effects, Parenting Style, and Son Preference," GLO Discussion Paper Series 1007, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

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