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Birth Order, Parental Health Investment, and Health in Childhood

Author

Listed:
  • Pruckner, Gerald J.

    (University of Linz)

  • Schneeweis, Nicole

    (University of Linz)

  • Schober, Thomas

    (Auckland University of Technology)

  • Zweimüller, Martina

    (University of Linz)

Abstract

This paper provides a comprehensive analysis of the relationship between birth order, health at birth and in childhood, and parental health investment using administrative data from Austria. We find significant birth order effects on health at birth and in primary school. These effects are positive, in that later-born siblings are healthier than the first-born child, and increase with birth order. Consequently, first-born children are more likely to consume medical drugs and to utilize medical services. We also find differences in parental health investment. First-born children are more likely to receive preventive medical care and immunization against measles, mumps, and rubella.

Suggested Citation

  • Pruckner, Gerald J. & Schneeweis, Nicole & Schober, Thomas & Zweimüller, Martina, 2019. "Birth Order, Parental Health Investment, and Health in Childhood," IZA Discussion Papers 12774, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp12774
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    18. Jee-Yeon K. Lehmann & Ana Nuevo-Chiquero & Marian Vidal-Fernandez, 2018. "The Early Origins of Birth Order Differences in Children’s Outcomes and Parental Behavior," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 53(1), pages 123-156.
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    Cited by:

    1. Humlum, Maria Knoth & Morthorst, Marius Opstrup & Thingholm, Peter Rønø, 2022. "Sibling Spillovers and the Choice to Get Vaccinated: Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design," IZA Discussion Papers 15109, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    birth order; parental health investment; parental health behavior; health at birth; health in childhood; health care utilization; vaccinations;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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