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Birth Order Effects and Educational Achievement in the Developing World

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  • Maximilian Schwefer

Abstract

Studies on the role of birth order in educational achievement in developing countries have yielded contradictory findings. This study uses unique and novel data on 4,362 siblings living in alternative care families in 54 countries. Results suggest negative birth order effects among biological siblings, implying inferior outcomes for laterborns. A second analysis offers reasons for why previous studies might have found contradictory results. Three sources of heterogeneity are surveyed. Extreme hardship, parental gender preferences, and tutoring between siblings are identified as moderators of birth order effects. The findings can inform development interventions by helping to prioritize individuals in highest need.

Suggested Citation

  • Maximilian Schwefer, 2018. "Birth Order Effects and Educational Achievement in the Developing World," ifo Working Paper Series 282, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ifowps:_282
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    Cited by:

    1. Ilpo Kauppinen & Panu Poutvaara, 2019. "Preferences for Redistribution and International Migration," ifo Working Paper Series 283, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Birth order; education; child outcomes; developing countries;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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