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Does Migration Make Rural Households More Productive? Evidence from Mexico

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Listed:
  • J. Edward Taylor

    (Agricultural and Development Economics Division, Food and Agriculture Organization)

  • Alejandro López-Feldman

    (Agricultural and Development Economics Division, Food and Agriculture Organization)

Abstract

The migration of labor out of rural areas and the flow of remittances from migrants to rural households is an increasingly important feature of less developed countries. This paper explores ways in which migration influences incomes and productivity of land and human capital in rural households over time, using new household survey data from Mexico. Our findings suggest that a massive increase in migration to the United States increased per-capita incomes via remittances and also by raising land productivity in migrant-sending households. They do not support the pessimistic view that migration discourages production in migrant-sending economies, nor the view implicit in separable agricultural household models that migration and remittances influence household incomes but not production.

Suggested Citation

  • J. Edward Taylor & Alejandro López-Feldman, 2007. "Does Migration Make Rural Households More Productive? Evidence from Mexico," Working Papers 07-10, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
  • Handle: RePEc:fao:wpaper:0710
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration; income; agricultural production; Mexico.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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