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Worlds in Motion: Understanding International Migration at the End of the Millennium

Author

Listed:
  • Massey, Douglas S.

    (Princeton University)

Abstract

At the end of the 20th century nearly all developed nations have become countries of immigration, absorbing growing numbers of immigrants not only from developed regions, but increasingly from developing nations of the Third World. Although international migration has come to play a central role in the social, economic, and demographic dynamics of both immigrant-sending and immigrant-receiving countries, social scientists have been slow to construct a comprehensive theory to explain it. Efforts at theoretical explanation have been fragmented by disciplinary, geographic, and methodological boundaries. Worlds in Motion seeks to overcome these schisms to create a comprehensive theory of international migration for the next century. After explicating the various propositions and hypotheses of current theories, and identifying area of complementarity and conflict, the authors review empirical research emanating from each of the world's principal international migration systems: North America, Western Europe, the Gulf, Asia and the Pacific, and the Southern Cone of South America. Using data from the 1980s, levels and patterns of migration within each system are described to define their structure and organization. Specific studies are then comprehensively surveyed to evaluate the fundamental propositions of neoclassical economics, the new economics of labour migration, segmented labour market theory, world systems theory, social capital theory, and the theory of cumulative causation. The various theories are also tested by applying them to the relationship between international migration and economic development. Although certain theories seem to function more effectively in certain systems, all contain elements of truth supported by empirical research. The task of the theorist is thus to identify which theories are most effective in accounting for international migration in the world today, and what regional and national circumstances lead to a predominance of one theoretical mechanism over another. The book concludes by offering an empirically-grounded theoretical synthesis to serve as a guide for researchers and policy-makers in the 21st century. Contributors to this volume - Douglas Massey, Princeton University Joaquin Arango, Complutense University of Madrid Graeme Hugo, University of Adelaide Ali Kouaouci, University of Montreal Adela Pellegrino, University of the Republic, Uruguay Edward J. Taylor, University of California, Davis

Suggested Citation

  • Massey, Douglas S., 2005. "Worlds in Motion: Understanding International Migration at the End of the Millennium," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199282760.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780199282760
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Perttu Salmenhaara, 2009. "Social capital in the mobilisation of human capital," Demográfia English Edition, Hungarian Demographic Research Institute, vol. 52(5), pages 97-123.
    2. Amelie F. Constant & Annabelle Krause & Ulf Rinne & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2011. "Economic preferences and attitudes of the unemployed: Are natives and second generation migrants alike?," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 32(7), pages 825-851, October.
    3. Artjoms Ivlevs & Roswitha M. King, "undated". "Kosovo - Winning Its Independence but Losing Its People? Recent Evidence on Emigration Intentions," Discussion Papers 09/17, University of Nottingham, GEP.
    4. Annett Fleischer, 2006. "Family, obligations, and migration: the role of kinship in Cameroon," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-047, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. repec:spr:eurpop:v:33:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10680-017-9426-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Annett Fleischer, 2007. "Family, obligations, and migration," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 16(13), pages 413-440, May.
    7. Arjen Leerkes & James D. Bachmeier & Mark A. Leach, 2013. "When the Border Is “Everywhere”: State-level Variation in Migration Control and Changing Settlement Patterns of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population in the United States," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(4), pages 910-943, December.
    8. J. Edward Taylor & George Dyer, 2009. "Migration and the Sending Economy: A Disaggregated Rural Economy-Wide Analysis," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(6), pages 966-989.
    9. Artjoms Ivlevs, 2013. "Minorities on the move? Assessing post-enlargement emigration intentions of Latvia’s Russian speaking minority," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 51(1), pages 33-52, August.
    10. J. Edward Taylor & Alejandro Lopez-Feldman, 2010. "Does Migration Make Rural Households More Productive? Evidence from Mexico," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(1), pages 68-90.
    11. Artjoms Ivlevs & Roswitha King, 2012. "Family Migration Capital and Migration Intentions," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 118-129, March.
    12. repec:bla:intmig:v:51:y:2017:i:2:p:542-564 is not listed on IDEAS

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