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Migration and the Sending Economy: A Disaggregated Rural Economy-Wide Analysis

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  • J. Edward Taylor
  • George Dyer

Abstract

Most economic research on migration impacts focuses on the households that send the migrants and get the remittances, ignoring linkages with others in the sending economies. This paper offers an alternative, disaggregated economy-wide perspective on migration and its impacts. Data from the 2003 Mexico National Rural Household Survey are used to calibrate a series of interacting rural household models nested within a general equilibrium model of the whole rural economy. Simulations reveal that the impacts of international migration and remittances on sending areas depend critically on the ways in which local markets transmit influences among households.

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  • J. Edward Taylor & George Dyer, 2009. "Migration and the Sending Economy: A Disaggregated Rural Economy-Wide Analysis," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(6), pages 966-989.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:45:y:2009:i:6:p:966-989
    DOI: 10.1080/00220380802265553
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    1. Taylor, J. Edward, 1992. "Remittances and inequality reconsidered: Direct, indirect, and intertemporal effects," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 187-208, April.
    2. Taylor, J. Edward & Dyer, George A. & Yunez-Naude, Antonio, 2005. "Disaggregated Rural Economywide Models for Policy Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1671-1688, October.
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    4. de Janvry, Alain & Fafchamps, Marcel & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 1991. "Peasant Household Behaviour with Missing Markets: Some Paradoxes Explained," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(409), pages 1400-1417, November.
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    7. Kaivan Munshi, 2003. "Networks in the Modern Economy: Mexican Migrants in the U. S. Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(2), pages 549-599.
    8. Lucas, Robert E B, 1987. "Emigration to South Africa's Mines," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(3), pages 313-330, June.
    9. J. Edward Taylor & Scott Rozelle & Alan deBrauw, 1999. "Migration, Remittances, and Agricultural Productivity in China," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 287-291, May.
    10. Faini,Riccardo C. & de Melo,Jaime & Zimmermann,Klaus (ed.), 1999. "Migration," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521662338, May.
    11. Stone, Richard, 1986. "Nobel Memorial Lecture 1984: The Accounts of Society," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 1(1), pages 5-28, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Karla Borja, 2014. "Social Capital, Remittances and Growth," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 26(5), pages 574-596, December.
    2. Karam Fida, 2010. "When Migrant Remittances Are Not Everlasting: How Can Morocco Make Up?," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 1-38, July.
    3. Melissa SIEGEL & Jennifer WAIDLER, 2012. "Migration and multi-dimensional poverty in Moldovan communities," Eastern Journal of European Studies, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 3, pages 105-119, December.
    4. Fida Karam, 2008. "When Migrant Remittances Are Not Everlasting, How Can Morocco Make Up?," Working Papers hal-00304885, HAL.
    5. Filipski, Mateusz & Aboudrare, Abdellah & Lybbert, Travis J. & Taylor, J. Edward, 2015. "Spice Price Spikes: Simulating Gendered Impacts of a Saffron Boom and Bust in Rural Mexico," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 229066, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Michael Christian Lehman, 2014. "Long-Run Effects Of Conditional Cash Transfers," Anais do XLI Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 41th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 223, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    7. Theodore Gerber & Karine Torosyan, 2013. "Remittances in the Republic of Georgia: Correlates, Economic Impact, and Social Capital Formation," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(4), pages 1279-1301, August.
    8. Filipski, Mateusz & Aboudrare, Abdellah & Lybbert, Travis J. & Taylor, J. Edward, 2017. "Spice Price Spikes: Simulating Impacts of Saffron Price Volatility in a Gendered Local Economy-Wide Model," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 84-99.
    9. Dyer, George A. & Taylor, J. Edward, 2011. "The Corn Price Surge: Impacts on Rural Mexico," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 1878-1887.
    10. J. Edward Taylor & Karen Thome, 2012. "A Methodology for Local Economy-wide Impact Evaluation (LEWIE) of Cash Transfers," One Pager 183, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    11. Murshed Chowdhury, 2016. "Financial Development, Remittances and Economic Growth: Evidence Using a Dynamic Panel Estimation," Margin: The Journal of Applied Economic Research, National Council of Applied Economic Research, vol. 10(1), pages 35-54, February.
    12. Filipski, Mateusz & Edward Taylor, J. & Msangi, Siwa, 2011. "Effects of Free Trade on Women and Immigrants: CAFTA and the Rural Dominican Republic," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 1862-1877.
    13. SHI, Xiaoping & HEERINK, Nico & QU, Futian, 2009. "The role of off-farm employment in the rural energy consumption transition -- A village-level analysis in Jiangxi Province, China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 350-359, June.

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