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Mass migration and seasonality: Evidence on Moldova's labour exodus

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  • Görlich, Dennis
  • Trebesch, Christoph

Abstract

This paper identifies the determinants and patterns of mass migration in Moldova a country in which migration has become the dominant socioeconomic phenomenon in a period of less than 8 years. Special emphasis is placed on seasonal migration, which has become increasingly popular in many Eastern European countries. Our findings indicate that poverty is a main push factor of migration decisions. Additionally, network effects and migration experience appear to be crucial for Moldovan migration flows. Concerning the choice of seasonal vs. permanent migration, we find that neither young dependents in the household nor marital status seem to influence the migrant’s decision of whether to leave seasonally or permanently. The main group of seasonal migrants are less educated men from rural areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Görlich, Dennis & Trebesch, Christoph, 2006. "Mass migration and seasonality: Evidence on Moldova's labour exodus," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 56, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:cegedp:56
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ariane TICHIT & Daniela BORODAK, 2009. "Should we stay or should we go? Irregular migration and duration of stay: the case of Moldovan migrants," Working Papers 200915, CERDI.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    migration decision; seasonal migration; poverty; CIS; Moldova;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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