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Mass migration and seasonality: Evidence on Moldova's labour exodus

  • Görlich, Dennis
  • Trebesch, Christoph

This paper identifies the determinants and patterns of mass migration in Moldova a country in which migration has become the dominant socioeconomic phenomenon in a period of less than 8 years. Special emphasis is placed on seasonal migration, which has become increasingly popular in many Eastern European countries. Our findings indicate that poverty is a main push factor of migration decisions. Additionally, network effects and migration experience appear to be crucial for Moldovan migration flows. Concerning the choice of seasonal vs. permanent migration, we find that neither young dependents in the household nor marital status seem to influence the migrant’s decision of whether to leave seasonally or permanently. The main group of seasonal migrants are less educated men from rural areas.

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File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/3823/1/56_Goerlich_Trebesch.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Goettingen, Department of Economics in its series Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers with number 56.

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Date of creation: 2006
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:cegedp:56
Contact details of provider: Postal: Platz der Göttinger Sieben 3, 37073 Göttingen
Web page: http://www.cege.wiso.uni-goettingen.de/

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  1. Dustmann, C, 1993. "Earnings Adjustment of Temporary Migrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 153-68, May.
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  3. Mckenzie, David & Rapoport, Hillel, 2007. "Network effects and the dynamics of migration and inequality: Theory and evidence from Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 1-24, September.
  4. Barham, Bradford & Boucher, Stephen, 1998. "Migration, remittances, and inequality: estimating the net effects of migration on income distribution," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 307-331, April.
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  9. Locher, Lilo, 2002. "Migration in the Soviet Successor States," IZA Discussion Papers 602, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Christian Dustmann, 1996. "Temporary Migration, Human capital and Language Fluency of Migrants," Discussion Papers 96-21 ISSN 1350-6722, University College London, Department of Economics.
  11. repec:dgr:uvatin:20030059 is not listed on IDEAS
  12. Dhori Kule & Ahmet Mançellari & Harry Papapanagos & Stefan Qirici & Peter Sanfey, 2000. "The Causes and Consequences of Albanian Emigration during Transition: Evidence from Micro Data," Studies in Economics 0004, School of Economics, University of Kent.
  13. Taylor, J. Edward & Mora, Jorge & Adams, Richard H., Jr., 2005. "Remittances, Inequality and Poverty: Evidence from Rural Mexico," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19245, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  14. Arjan de Haan, 1999. "Livelihoods and poverty: The role of migration - a critical review of the migration literature," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 1-47.
  15. Dustmann, Christian, 2000. "Temporary Migration and Economic Assimilation," IZA Discussion Papers 186, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  16. Dustmann, Christian, 1994. "Differences in the Labour Market Behaviour Between Temporary and Permanent Migrant Women," CEPR Discussion Papers 947, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  17. J. Edward Taylor & Scott Rozelle & Alan deBrauw, 1999. "Migration, Remittances, and Agricultural Productivity in China," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 287-291, May.
  18. Adams, Richard H, Jr, 1989. "Worker Remittances and Inequality in Rural Egypt," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 38(1), pages 45-71, October.
  19. Carrington, William J & Detragiache, Enrica & Vishwanath, Tara, 1996. "Migration with Endogenous Moving Costs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 909-30, September.
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