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The Causes and Consequences of Albanian Emigration during Transition: Evidence from Micro Data

Author

Listed:
  • Dhori Kule
  • Ahmet Mançellari
  • Harry Papapanagos
  • Stefan Qirici
  • Peter Sanfey

    ()

Abstract

This note reports the results of field surveys of individuals and firms in Albania, carried out during 1998. The surveys were designed to analyse the extent of emigration from Albania during the 1990s and its causes and consequences. Our results show that emigrants are motivated mainly by the ease of access to neighbouring countries and by the prospect of high financial returns. Although most emigrants worked illegally and had part-time, low-skilled jobs, the majority found the overall experience positive, and the skills and earnings they acquired abroad have contributed to establishing businesses upon their return. These results have important policy implications for both EU countries and other transition countries in the region.

Suggested Citation

  • Dhori Kule & Ahmet Mançellari & Harry Papapanagos & Stefan Qirici & Peter Sanfey, 2000. "The Causes and Consequences of Albanian Emigration during Transition: Evidence from Micro Data," Studies in Economics 0004, School of Economics, University of Kent.
  • Handle: RePEc:ukc:ukcedp:0004
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    File URL: ftp://ftp.ukc.ac.uk/pub/ejr/RePEc/ukc/ukcedp/0004.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Peter Sanfey & Harry Papapanagos, 2001. "Intention to emigrate in transition countries: the case of Albania," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 491-504.
    2. Faini,Riccardo C. & de Melo,Jaime & Zimmermann,Klaus (ed.), 1999. "Migration," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521662338, March.
    3. Manski, C.F., 1989. "The Use Of Intentions Data To Predict Behaviour : A Best- Case Analysis," Working papers 8905, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
    4. Ahmet Mancellari & Harry Papapanagos & Peter Sanfey, 1996. "Job creation and temporary emigration: the Albanian experience," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 4(2), pages 471-490, October.
    5. Harris, John R & Todaro, Michael P, 1970. "Migration, Unemployment & Development: A Two-Sector Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(1), pages 126-142, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yordan Kalchev & Valentin Goev & Vesselin Mintchev & Venelin Boshnakov, 2004. "Bulgarian Emigration in the Beginning of ÕÕI Century: an Assessment of Attitudes and the Profile of Potential Emigrants," Economic Thought journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 5, pages 3-30.
    2. Yordan Kalchev, & Valentin Goev & Vesselin Mintchev & Venelin Boshnakov, 2004. "External Migration from Bulgaria at the Beginning of the XXI Century: Estimates of Potential Emigrants’ Attitudes and Profile," Economic Thought journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 7, pages 137-161.
    3. Tapan Biswas & Jolian McHardy, 2004. "Aspects of International Labour Mobility in Southern EU Countries," South-Eastern Europe Journal of Economics, Association of Economic Universities of South and Eastern Europe and the Black Sea Region, vol. 2(1), pages 67-83.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Emigration; Albania;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe
    • P2 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies

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