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“Stay with Us”? The Impact of Emigration on Wages in Honduras

  • Gagnon, Jason
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    While the econometric literature on the impact of immigration on labour markets is well developed, there is a striking gap in the migration literature concerning the impact of emigration on sending countries. This paper attempts to narrow that gap by investigating whether the large and intense emigration period from Honduras from 2001 to 2007 to the US increased wages in Honduras, by focusing on skill-groups (education + experience) as defined in Borjas (2003). The estimates show that between 2001 and 2007, a 10% increase in emigration increased wages in Honduras by 1% to 3%, an increase which is slightly lower than previous findings in other countries.

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    Paper provided by Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics in its series Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Hannover 2010 with number 57.

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    Date of creation: 2010
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    Handle: RePEc:zbw:gdec10:57
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    1. Mariapia Mendola & Gero Carletto, 2008. "International migration and gender differentials in the home labor market: evidence from Albania," Working Papers 148, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2008.
    2. Mishra, Prachi, 2007. "Emigration and wages in source countries: Evidence from Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 180-199, January.
    3. Carlo Azzarri & Gero Carletto & Benjamin Davis & Alberto Zezza, 2006. "Choosing to Migrate or Migrating to Choose: Migration and Labour Choice in Albania," Working Papers 06-06, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
    4. Bouton, Lawrence & Paul, Saumik & Tiongson, Erwin R., 2011. "The impact of emigration on source country wages : evidence from the Republic of Moldova," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5764, The World Bank.
    5. Christian Dustmann & Francesca Fabbri & Ian Preston, 2005. "The Impact of Immigration on the British Labour Market," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(507), pages F324-F341, November.
    6. Fida KARAM & Bernard DECALUWÉ, . "Migration Impact on Moroccan Unemployment: a Static Computable General Equilibrium Analysis," EcoMod2008 23800058, EcoMod.
    7. Michael Lokshin & Elena Glinskaya, 2009. "The Effect of Male Migration on Employment Patterns of Women in Nepal," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 23(3), pages 481-507, November.
    8. Dennis Görlich & Toman Omar Mahmoud & Christoph Trebesch, 2007. "Explaining Labour Market Inactivity in Migrant-Sending Families: Housework, Hammock, or Higher Education," Kiel Working Papers 1391, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
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