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Choosing to Migrate or Migrating to Choose: Migration and Labour Choice in Albania

Author

Listed:
  • Carlo Azzarri

    (Agricultural and Development Economics Division, Food and Agriculture Organization)

  • Gero Carletto

    (Agricultural and Development Economics Division, Food and Agriculture Organization)

  • Benjamin Davis

    (Agricultural and Development Economics Division, Food and Agriculture Organization)

  • Alberto Zezza

    (Agricultural and Development Economics Division, Food and Agriculture Organization)

Abstract

While sustainable economic growth, poverty reduction, and the management of migration flows are among the most pressing items on the policy agenda in Albania, very little systematic analysis exists of the income generating strategies of Albanian households within the emerging market economy, and how this relates to income dynamics, people’s mobility and poverty. Results show that agricultural, migration and human capital assets have a differential impact across livelihood choices, and that this impact varies by gender and age. Two areas of policy concern derive from this analysis. First, migration is clearly crucial for the economic future of Albania, both in terms of financing economic development, serving as an informal safety net, and in reducing excess labour supply and poverty. The suggestion of a potential disincentive effect on labour effort and participation is however worrying, as it would have implications in terms of missed opportunities for development. Second, agriculture appears to be more of a survival strategy than part of a poverty exit strategy.

Suggested Citation

  • Carlo Azzarri & Gero Carletto & Benjamin Davis & Alberto Zezza, 2006. "Choosing to Migrate or Migrating to Choose: Migration and Labour Choice in Albania," Working Papers 06-06, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
  • Handle: RePEc:fao:wpaper:0606
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Talip Kilic & Calogero Carletto & Benjamin Davis & Alberto Zezza, 2009. "Investing back home," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 17(3), pages 587-623, July.
    2. Kalaj, Ermira Hoxha, 2010. "Are Remittances Spent in a Healthy Way? Evidence from Albania," MPRA Paper 49172, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Gagnon, Jason, 2010. "“Stay with Us”? The Impact of Emigration on Wages in Honduras," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Hannover 2010 57, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    4. Juna Miluka & Gero Carletto & Benjamin Davis & Alberto Zezza, 2010. "The Vanishing Farms? The Impact of International Migration on Albanian Family Farming," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(1), pages 140-161.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration; Agriculture; Occupational choice; Albania.;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets

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