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International migration and gender differentials in the home labor market: evidence from Albania

  • Mariapia Mendola
  • Gero Carletto

    ()

This paper examines the role of male-dominated international migration in shaping labor market outcomes by gender in migrant-sending households in Albania. Using detailed information on family migration experience from the latest Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS) survey, we find that male and female labor supplies respond differently to current and past migration episodes of household members. Controlling for the potential endogeneity of migration and for the income (remittances) effect, estimates show that having a migrant abroad decreases female paid labor supply while increasing unpaid work. On the other hand, women with household members with past migration experience are significantly more likely to engage in self-employment and less likely to supply unpaid work. The same relationships do not hold for men. These findings suggest that over time male-dominated Albanian migration may lead to women’s empowerment in the access to income-earning opportunities at origin.

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File URL: http://dipeco.economia.unimib.it/repec/pdf/mibwpaper148.pdf
File Function: First version, 2008
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Paper provided by University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 148.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2008
Date of revision: Dec 2008
Handle: RePEc:mib:wpaper:148
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