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A New Look at Gender Effects in Participation and Occupation Choice

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  • Didier Soopramanien
  • Geraint Johnes

Abstract

In this paper we evaluate the extent to which changes over time in women's labour market destinations are due to characteristics, on the one hand, and prices, on the other. Multinomial and nested logit methods are used to analyse US data for 1970 and 1990, and the results are compared. The latter method, which has not previously been employed in the present context, alleviates problems due to the strong assumption in simpler models of the independence of irrelevant alternatives, and provides much additional useful information. Copyright Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishers Ltd 2001.

Suggested Citation

  • Didier Soopramanien & Geraint Johnes, 2001. "A New Look at Gender Effects in Participation and Occupation Choice," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 15(3), pages 415-443, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:15:y:2001:i:3:p:415-443
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Baul, Tushi, 2013. "Self-selection and peer-effects in experimental labor markets," ISU General Staff Papers 201301010800004327, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    2. repec:lan:wpaper:4354 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Mariapia Mendola & Gero Carletto, 2008. "International migration and gender differentials in the home labor market: evidence from Albania," Working Papers 148, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2008.
    4. Larry L. Howard & Nishith Prakash, 2012. "Do employment quotas explain the occupational choices of disadvantaged minorities in India?," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(4), pages 489-513, August.
    5. repec:lan:wpaper:4788 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:lan:wpaper:4483 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. R Freguglia & G Spricigo & G Johnes & A Aggarwal, 2011. "Education and labour market outcomes: evidence from Brazil," Working Papers 615809, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.

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