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Left behind to farm ? women's labor re-allocation in rural China

  • Mu, Ren
  • van de Walle, Dominique

The transformation of work during China’s rapid economic development is associated with a substantial but little noticed re-allocation of traditional farm labor among women, with some doing much less and some much more. This paper studies how the work, time allocation, and health of non-migrant women are affected by the out-migration of others in their household. The analysis finds that the women left behind are doing more farm work than would have otherwise been the case. There is also evidence that this is a persistent effect, and not just temporary re-allocation. For some types of women (notably older women), the labor re-allocation response comes out of their leisure.

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Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 5107.

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Date of creation: 01 Oct 2009
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5107
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  1. Joyce J. Chen, 2006. "Migration and Imperfect Monitoring: Implications for Intra-Household Allocation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 227-231, May.
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  5. de Brauw, Alan & Giles, John, 2008. "Migrant Labor Markets and the Welfare of Rural Households in the Developing World: Evidence from China," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6085, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  6. Michel Beine & Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, . "Brain drain and human capital formation in developing countries: winners and losers?," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/10415, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
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  8. Mariapia Mendola & Gero Carletto, 2009. "International Migration and Gender Differentials in the Home Labor Market: Evidence from Albania," Development Working Papers 272, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano.
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  11. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2010. "Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262232588, March.
  12. de la Rupelle, Maëlys & Quheng, Deng & Li, Shi & Vendryes, Thomas, 2009. "Land Rights Insecurity and Temporary Migration in Rural China," IZA Discussion Papers 4668, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  15. Duncan Thomas, 1994. "Like Father, like Son; Like Mother, like Daughter: Parental Resources and Child Height," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(4), pages 950-988.
  16. Zhao, Yaohui, 2002. "Causes and Consequences of Return Migration: Recent Evidence from China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 376-394, June.
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  23. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00575041 is not listed on IDEAS
  24. Zhang, Linxiu & de Brauw, Alan & Rozelle, Scott, 2004. "China's rural labor market development and its gender implications," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 230-247.
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