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The Effect of Emigration on Household Labor Supply: Evidence from Central Asia and South Caucasus

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  • Paul, Saumik

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

Abstract

Using a novel data set, this paper find that households with migrants experience a 26% drop in the labor force participation rate in four economies (Armenia, Azerbaijan, the Kyrgyz Republic, and Tajikistan) from the Central Asia and South Caucasus region. It is twice as large for households with permanent migrants as for households with seasonal migrants. The results do not alter in the presence of selection on unobservables, model misspecification, and selection bias due to the absence of more productive workers. Direct evidence on the remittances that each household received is not available. The empirical findings do, however, suggest the possibility of an increase in reservation wages.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul, Saumik, 2018. "The Effect of Emigration on Household Labor Supply: Evidence from Central Asia and South Caucasus," ADBI Working Papers 822, Asian Development Bank Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:adbiwp:0822
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Arabsheibani, Reza & Kudebayeva, Alma & Mussurov, Altay, 2021. "Bride Kidnapping and Labour Supply Behaviour of Married Kyrgyz Women," IZA Discussion Papers 14133, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    emigration; labor mobility;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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