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Migration Impact on Moroccan Unemployment: a Static Computable General Equilibrium Analysis

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  • Fida KARAM
  • Bernard DECALUWÉ

Abstract

Recently, much research interest is directed towards the impact of migration on the sending country. However, we think that this literature does not successfully analyse the effects of migration on unemployment and wage rates especially in urban areas. It studies the effect of one king of migration flow, mainly international migration, on labour market in the country of origin and shows that international migration is able to reduce the unemployment rate and/or raise the wage rates. However, it is common to find labour markets affected simultaneously by inflows and outflows of workers. Using a detailed CGE model applied to the Moroccan economy, we show that if we take simultaneously into account Moroccan emigration to the European Union, immigration from Sub-Saharan Africa into Moroccan urban areas and rural-urban migration, the impact on Moroccan urban labour market disaggregated by professional categories is ambiguous.
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Suggested Citation

  • Fida KARAM & Bernard DECALUWÉ, 2008. "Migration Impact on Moroccan Unemployment: a Static Computable General Equilibrium Analysis," EcoMod2008 23800058, EcoMod.
  • Handle: RePEc:ekd:000238:23800058
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    Cited by:

    1. Fida Karam, 2008. "When Migrant Remittances Are Not Everlasting, How Can Morocco Make Up?," Working Papers hal-00304885, HAL.
    2. Gagnon, Jason, 2010. "“Stay with Us”? The Impact of Emigration on Wages in Honduras," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Hannover 2010 57, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    3. Fida Karam, 2008. "When Migrant Remittances Are Not Everlasting, How Can Morocco Make Up ?," Post-Print halshs-00344833, HAL.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F0 - International Economics - - General
    • D92 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Intertemporal Firm Choice, Investment, Capacity, and Financing

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