IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Skilled Migration, FDI and Human Capital Investment

  • Daniele Checchi

    (University of Milan and IZA)

  • Gianfranco De Simone

    (University of Milan and Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano)

  • Riccardo Faini

    (formerly University of Rome tor Vergata, CEPR, IZA and Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano)

In a globalised world, where factors of production are increasingly mobile, the process of domestic accumulation of HC can be affected in several ways through migration and capital inflows. In addition, endowment of skilled labour and foreign direct investments(FDI) may reinforce each other through possible “complementary effects”. Our paper aims to advance the existing empirical literature on the relationship between international factor mobility and domestic accumulation of HC in developing countries. We provide new evidence on how the presence of foreign firms in the domestic economy and the emigration of skilled workers impact the domestic school enrolment. We also investigate whether existing supply of skilled labour is a significant determinant of inward flows of foreign capital. The interdependence between factor mobility and HC accumulation supports some simple back-of-the-envelop calculations that tend to exclude the presence of a significant ongoing virtuous circle between HC accumulation and FDI inflows. Less developed countries tend to gain domestic human capital under foreign capital inflow (job opportunities for skilled individuals), but they loose domestic human capital through the emigration of highly educated people both directly and indirectly (“disincentive effect” on further investment in higher education).

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://services.bepress.com/unimi/economics/art25
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Universitá degli Studi di Milano in its series UNIMI - Research Papers in Economics, Business, and Statistics with number unimi-1067.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 30 Nov 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bep:unimip:unimi-1067
Note: oai:cdlib1:unimi-1067
Contact details of provider: Postal: Via Conservatorio 7 - 20122 Milano
Phone: +39 02 503 16486
Fax: +39 02 503 16475
Web page: http://services.bepress.com/unimi

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Frédéric Docquier & Elisabetta Lodigiani, 2008. "Skilled migration and business networks," CREA Discussion Paper Series 08-11, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
  2. Faini, Riccardo, 2004. "Trade Liberalization in a Globalizing World," IZA Discussion Papers 1406, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Koji Miyamoto, 2003. "Human Capital Formation and Foreign Direct Investment in Developing Countries," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 211, OECD Publishing.
  4. Barro, Robert J & Lee, Jong-Wha, 2001. "International Data on Educational Attainment: Updates and Implications," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(3), pages 541-63, July.
  5. Stark, Oded & Helmenstein, Christian & Prskawetz, Alexia, 1997. "A brain gain with a brain drain," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 227-234, August.
  6. Michael Grossman, 2005. "Education and Nonmarket Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 11582, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Fabio, MARIANI, 2004. "Brain Drain, Inequality and Growth," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2004033, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  8. Bruce A. Blonigen, 2005. "A Review of the Empirical Literature on FDI Determinants," NBER Working Papers 11299, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Michel Beine & Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2001. "Brain drain and economic growth: theory and evidence," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/10449, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  10. Docquier, Frederic & Marfouk, Abdeslam, 2004. "Measuring the international mobility of skilled workers (1990-2000) : release 1.0," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3381, The World Bank.
  11. Sapir, André, 2000. "Who is Afraid of Globalization? The Challenge of Domestic Adjustment in Europe and America," CEPR Discussion Papers 2595, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  12. Stark, Oded & Helmenstein, Christian & Prskawetz, Alexia, 1998. "Human capital depletion, human capital formation, and migration: a blessing or a "curse"?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 363-367, September.
  13. Beck, Thorsten & Demirguc-Kunt, Asli & Levine, Ross, 1999. "A new database on financial development and structure," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2146, The World Bank.
  14. Daniele Checchi, 2003. "Inequality in Incomes and Access to Education: A Cross-country Analysis (1960-95)," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 17(2), pages 153-201, 06.
  15. José Luis Groizard & Joan Llull, 2006. "Skilled migration and growth. Testing brain drain and brain gain theories," DEA Working Papers 20, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Departament d'Economía Aplicada.
  16. William Carrington & Enrica Detragiache, 1998. "How Big is the Brain Drain?," IMF Working Papers 98/102, International Monetary Fund.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bep:unimip:unimi-1067. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Christopher F. Baum)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.