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On Asymmetric Migration Patterns from Developing Countries

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  • Acharyya, Rajat
  • Kar, Saibal

Abstract

This paper shows that trade and emigration of skilled workers from a poor country is complementary but that between trade and emigration of unskilled workers is a substitute. The asymmetric effect of more openness to trade on the local wages seems to be crucial in driving such results. The asymmetric changes in skilled and unskilled wages generate counterintuitive outcomes regardless of the policy shock that triggers such wage effect. One of the more compelling outcomes is rise in wage inequality as influenced by asymmetric emigration patterns.

Suggested Citation

  • Acharyya, Rajat & Kar, Saibal, 2017. "On Asymmetric Migration Patterns from Developing Countries," GLO Discussion Paper Series 4, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:4
    as

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    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/150055/1/GLO_DP_0004.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Trade; emigration; skilled labour; specific factor; remittances; tax;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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