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Preliminary Evidence On Internal Migration, Remittances, And Teen Schooling In India

  • VALERIE MUELLER
  • ABUSALEH SHARIFF

Migration can serve as an outlet for employment, higher earnings, and reduced income risk for households in developing countries. The 2004–2005 Human Development Profile of India survey is used to examine correlations between the receipt of remittances from internal migrants and human capital investment in rural areas. A propensity score–matching approach to account for the selectivity of households is used into receiving remittances. [IFPRI Discussion Paper 00858].

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Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Contemporary Economic Policy.

Volume (Year): 29 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 (04)
Pages: 207-217

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Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:29:y:2011:i:2:p:207-217
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