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Tied Migration and Subsequent Employment: Evidence from Couples in Britain

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  • Mark P. Taylor

Abstract

We use unique information on migration behaviour and reasons for migration to study the impact of tied migration on labour market outcomes among husbands and wives. Fewer than 2% of couples migrate for job-related reasons and the majority of these move for reasons associated with the husband's job. Estimates from dynamic random-effects models indicate that husbands and wives in couples that migrated for job-related reasons suffer lower job retention rates than non-migrants. Tied migration reduces the probability of subsequent employment for both husbands and wives and in particular has a large negative impact on job retention rates among wives. Copyright 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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  • Mark P. Taylor, 2007. "Tied Migration and Subsequent Employment: Evidence from Couples in Britain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 69(6), pages 795-818, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:69:y:2007:i:6:p:795-818
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    Cited by:

    1. Darja Reuschke, 2011. "Self-Employment and Geographical Mobility in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 417, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Kent Eliasson & Robert Nakosteen & Olle Westerlund & Michael Zimmer, 2014. "All in the family: Self-selection and migration by couples," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(1), pages 101-124, March.
    3. repec:oup:oxecpp:v:69:y:2017:i:3:p:734-757. is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Martyn Andrews & Ken Clark & William Whittaker, 2011. "The determinants of regional migration in Great Britain: a duration approach," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 174(1), pages 127-153, January.
    5. Jennifer Roberts & Karl Taylor, 2017. "Intra-household commuting choices and local labour markets," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(3), pages 734-757.
    6. Birgitta Rabe & Mark P. Taylor, 2012. "Differences in Opportunities? Wage, Employment and House-Price Effects on Migration," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 74(6), pages 831-855, December.
    7. Åström, Johanna & Westerlund, Olle, 2009. "Sex and Migration: Who is the Tied Mover?," Umeå Economic Studies 787, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
    8. D. Isebaert, 2013. "Housing Tenure and Geographical Mobility in Belgium," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 13/855, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    9. Zaiceva, Anzelika, 2010. "East-West migration and gender: Is there a differential effect for migrant women?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 443-454, April.
    10. Thomas J. Cooke, 2013. "All tied up: Tied staying and tied migration within the United States, 1997 to 2007," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(30), pages 817-836, October.
    11. David McArthur & Inge Thorsen, 2011. "Determinants of internal migration in Norway," ERSA conference papers ersa10p532, European Regional Science Association.
    12. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s00168-015-0728-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. repec:crs:ecosta:es415-416d is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Nuno Crespo & Nadia Simoes & Sandrina B. Moreira, 2014. "Gender differences in occupational mobility - evidence from Portugal," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(4), pages 460-481, July.
    15. Jean-Jacques Arrighi & Céline Gasquet & Valérie Roux, 2008. "Des mobilités résidentielles de début de carrière moins favorables aux femmes," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 415(1), pages 61-80.
    16. Acharyya, Rajat & Kar, Saibal, 2017. "On Asymmetric Migration Patterns from Developing Countries," GLO Discussion Paper Series 4, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    17. Erin Trouth Hofmann & Cynthia J. Buckley, 2013. "Global Changes and Gendered Responses: The Feminization of Migration From Georgia," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(3), pages 508-538, September.
    18. M. L. Blackburn, 2010. "The Impact of Internal Migration on Married Couples' Earnings in Britain," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 77(307), pages 584-603, July.

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