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Migration, Job Change, and Wage Growth: A New Perspective on the Pecuniary Return to Geographic Mobility

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  • Jeffrey J. Yankow

Abstract

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, this study examines the pattern of early career job mobility and migration in a sample of young male workers. Primary interest lies in the between-job wage change accompanying job transitions as well as the extended time-profile of migrant earnings. When the sample of job transitions is partitioned by education level, contemporaneous returns are found only for workers with twelve or less years of completed schooling. In contrast, highly educated workers demonstrate significant extended returns to migration with the bulk of pecuniary rewards accruing with a lag of nearly two years. Copyright Blackwell Publishing, Inc. 2003

Suggested Citation

  • Jeffrey J. Yankow, 2003. "Migration, Job Change, and Wage Growth: A New Perspective on the Pecuniary Return to Geographic Mobility," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(3), pages 483-516.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:43:y:2003:i:3:p:483-516
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