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The Returns to Mobility and Job Search by Gender

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  • Kristen Keith
  • Abagail McWilliams

Abstract

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the authors estimate the returns to job search, mobility, and the interaction of search and mobility for young men and women. They find statistically significant gender differences in mobility patterns and search behavior, but not in the returns to a given behavior. Both men and women engaged in substantial job search and mobility early in their careers, which resulted in wage growth premiums. There is evidence of an interactive effect: returns to search were realized through mobility, and returns to mobility were augmented by search.

Suggested Citation

  • Kristen Keith & Abagail McWilliams, 1999. "The Returns to Mobility and Job Search by Gender," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(3), pages 460-477, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:52:y:1999:i:3:p:460-477
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    Cited by:

    1. Adele Bergin, 2015. "Employer Changes and Wage Changes: Estimation with Measurement Error in a Binary Variable," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 29(2), pages 194-223, June.
    2. Sami Napari, 2008. "The Early‐career Gender Wage Gap among University Graduates in the Finnish Private Sector," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 22(4), pages 697-733, December.
    3. Ferreira, Priscila, 2009. "The determinants of promotions and firm separations," ISER Working Paper Series 2009-11, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Napari, Sami, . "Essays on the Gender Wage Gap in Finland," ETLA A, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy, number 44.
    5. Roger Wilkins & Mark Wooden, 2013. "Gender Differences in Involuntary Job Loss: Why Are Men More Likely to Lose Their Jobs?," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 582-608, April.
    6. Biasi, Barbara & Sarsons, Heather, 2020. "Flexible Wages, Bargaining, and the Gender Gap," IZA Discussion Papers 13754, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Kai Liu, 2016. "Explaining the gender wage gap: Estimates from a dynamic model of job changes and hours changes," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 7(2), pages 411-447, July.
    8. Fujii, Mayu & Shiraishi, Kousuke & Takayama, Noriyuki, 2018. "The effects of early job separation on later life outcomes," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 68-84.
    9. Marie-Benoît Magrini & Philippe Lemistre, 2013. "Distance--Income Migration Trade-off of Young French Workers: An Analysis per Education Level," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(2), pages 282-295, February.
    10. Jeffrey J. Yankow, 2017. "Employed Job Search among Young Workers: Do Women Still Search Differently than Men in the Internet Age?," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 23(2), pages 245-259, May.
    11. Michaelides, Marios, 2011. "The effect of local ties, wages, and housing costs on migration decisions," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 132-140, April.
    12. Henry Hyatt & Erika McEntarfer & John Haltiwanger, 2014. "Cyclical Reallocation of Workers Across Large and Small Employers," 2014 Meeting Papers 735, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    13. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Serrano-Padial, Ricardo, 2007. "Wage Growth Implications of Fixed-Term Employment: An Analysis by Contract Duration and Job Mobility," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(5), pages 829-847, October.
    14. Johannes Wieschke, 2018. "Frequency of employer changes and their financial return: gender differences amongst German university graduates," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 52(1), pages 1-13, December.
    15. Reichelt, Malte & Abraham, Martin, 2015. "Occupational and regional mobility as substitutes : a new approach to understanding job changes and wage inequality," IAB Discussion Paper 201514, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    16. Barth, Erling & Dale-Olsen, Harald, 2009. "Monopsonistic discrimination, worker turnover, and the gender wage gap," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 589-597, October.
    17. David S Loughran & Julie Zissimopoulos, 2008. "Why Wait? The Effect of Marriage and Childbearing on the Wages of Men and Women," Working Papers WR-482-1, RAND Corporation.
    18. Nuno Crespo & Nadia Simoes & Sandrina B. Moreira, 2014. "Gender differences in occupational mobility - evidence from Portugal," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(4), pages 460-481, July.
    19. Erling Barth & Harald Dale-Olsen, 1999. "Monopsonistic Discrimination and the Gender-Wage Gap," NBER Working Papers 7197, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Brenzel, Hanna & Reichelt, Malte, 2015. "Job mobility as a new explanation for the immigrant-native wage gap : a longitudinal analysis for the German labor market," IAB Discussion Paper 201512, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    21. Karen L. Webber & Manuel González Canché, 2018. "Is There a Gendered Path to Tenure? A Multi-State Approach to Examine the Academic Trajectories of U.S. Doctoral Recipients in the Sciences," Research in Higher Education, Springer;Association for Institutional Research, vol. 59(7), pages 897-932, November.

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