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An Empirical Model of Employed Search, Unemployed Search, and Nonsearch

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  • Lawrence M. Kahn
  • Stuart A. Low

Abstract

The 1969-1971 National Longitudinal Surveys data on young men were used to study the employed worker's choice among employed search, unemployed search, and not searching for a new job. We assume that an unobserved variable, search intensity, governs this choice such that unemployed search involves a greater intensity than employed search, which, of course, is associated with greater intensity than nonsearch. The principal results are that current wages, seniority, collective bargaining coverage, employment outside construction, and employment by government are each, ceteris paribus, negatively associated with search intensity. Further, each of these variables lowers the probability of not searching and raises the probabilities of employed and unemployed job search.

Suggested Citation

  • Lawrence M. Kahn & Stuart A. Low, 1984. "An Empirical Model of Employed Search, Unemployed Search, and Nonsearch," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 19(1), pages 104-117.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:19:y:1984:i:1:p:104-117
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    Cited by:

    1. Neumann, Todd C. & Fishback, Price V. & Kantor, Shawn, 2010. "The Dynamics of Relief Spending and the Private Urban Labor Market During the New Deal," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 70(01), pages 195-220, March.
    2. Deborah Cobb-Clark & Paul Frijters & Guyonne Kalb, 2004. "Job Search Success: Comparing Job Offer Rates In and Out of Employment," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2004n13, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    3. Castellano, Rosalia & Punzo, Gennaro & Rocca, Antonella, 2013. "Women’s job search propensity and selection effect in European labour markets," MPRA Paper 50869, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Deborah Cobb-Clark & Paul Frijters & Guyonne Kalb, 2004. "Do You Need a Job to Find a Job?," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 186d, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    5. Julie Hotchkiss, 1999. "The effect of transitional employment on search duration: A selectivity approach," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 27(1), pages 38-52, March.
    6. Bratberg, Espen & Nilsen, Øivind Anti, 1998. "Transition from School to Work: Search Time and Job Duration," IZA Discussion Papers 27, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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