IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/atlecj/v27y1999i1p38-52.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The effect of transitional employment on search duration: A selectivity approach

Author

Listed:
  • Julie Hotchkiss

Abstract

This paper presents an analysis of the impact of transitional employment (employment fully contained within a search spell) on search duration. Log-linear duration equations, which are derived from an accelerated time-life specification, are estimated separately for those who take and do not take a transitional job. Selectivity terms are included as additional regressors in the specification in order to control for the endogeneity of the decision to take a transitional job. The presence of right-censored search spells is controlled for and the standard errors are corrected to account for the inclusion of generated regressors. A searcher who takes a transitional job can expect to be searching for permanent employment almost eight months longer and has a substantially different escape pattern than a searcher who does not take a transitional job. Copyright International Atlantic Economic Society 1999

Suggested Citation

  • Julie Hotchkiss, 1999. "The effect of transitional employment on search duration: A selectivity approach," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 27(1), pages 38-52, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:atlecj:v:27:y:1999:i:1:p:38-52
    DOI: 10.1007/BF02299176
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/BF02299176
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Benhabib, Jess & Bull, Clive, 1983. "Job Search: The Choice of Intensity," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(5), pages 747-764, October.
    2. Viscusi, W Kip, 1979. "Job Hazards and Worker Quit Rates: An Analysis of Adaptive Worker Behavior," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 20(1), pages 29-58, February.
    3. Devine, Theresa J. & Kiefer, Nicolas M., 1991. "Empirical Labor Economics: The Search Approach," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195059366.
    4. Kiefer, Nicholas M, 1988. "Economic Duration Data and Hazard Functions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 646-679, June.
    5. Matthew Black, 1981. "An Empirical Test of the Theory of On-The-Job Search," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 16(1), pages 129-140.
    6. Blau, David M & Robins, Philip K, 1990. "Job Search Outcomes for the Employed and Unemployed," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(3), pages 637-655, June.
    7. Robert G. Valletta, 1991. "Job Tenure and Joblessness of Displaced Workers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(4), pages 726-741.
    8. Tunali, Insan & Assaad, Ragui, 1992. "Market Structure and Spells of Employment and Unemployment: Evidence from the Construction Sector in Egypt," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(4), pages 339-367, Oct.-Dec..
    9. Albert Ma, Ching-to & Weiss, Andrew M., 1993. "A signaling theory of unemployment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 135-157, January.
    10. Gary Burtless, 1983. "Why Is Insured Unemployment So Low?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 14(1), pages 225-254.
    11. Tobin, James, 1972. "Inflation and Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(1), pages 1-18, March.
    12. Lancaster, Tony, 1985. "Generalised residuals and heterogeneous duration models : With applications to the Weilbull model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 155-169, April.
    13. Burgess, Simon M, 1992. "A Search Model with Job Changing Costs: 'Eurosclerosis' and Unemployment," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 44(1), pages 75-88, January.
    14. Hotchkiss, Julie L., 1992. "Search Duration and Intermediate, Transitional Work," MPRA Paper 9331, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Yoon, Bong Joon, 1981. "A Model of Unemployment Duration with Variable Search Intensity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 63(4), pages 599-609, November.
    16. Burdett, Kenneth & Kiefer, Nicholas M. & Sharma, Sunil, 1985. "Layoffs and duration dependence in a model of turnover," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 51-69, April.
    17. Kenneth Burdett & Nicholas M. Kiefer & Dale T. Mortensen & George R. Neumann, 1984. "Earnings, Unemployment, and the Allocation of Time Over Time," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(4), pages 559-578.
    18. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    19. Lippman, Steven A & McCall, John J, 1976. "The Economics of Job Search: A Survey," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 14(3), pages 347-368, September.
    20. David M. Blau, 1992. "An Empirical Analysis of Employed and Unemployed Job Search Behavior," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 45(4), pages 738-752, July.
    21. Lawrence M. Kahn & Stuart A. Low, 1984. "An Empirical Model of Employed Search, Unemployed Search, and Nonsearch," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 19(1), pages 104-117.
    22. Harry J. Holzer, 1987. "Job Search by Employed and Unemployed Youth," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 40(4), pages 601-611, July.
    23. Honda, Yuzo, 1982. "On Tests of Equality between Sets of Coefficients in Two Linear Regressions When Disturbance Variances Are Unequal," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 50(2), pages 116-125, June.
    24. Gronau, Reuben, 1971. "Information and Frictional Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 61(3), pages 290-301, June.
    25. Mattila, J Peter, 1974. "Job Quitting and Frictional Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 64(1), pages 235-239, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Lia Pacelli & Silvia Pasqua & Claudia Villosio, 2007. "What Does the Stork Bring to Women’s Working Career?," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 58, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.
    2. Gunther Tichy, 2014. "Flexicurity – A Concept Doomed to Failure," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 87(8), pages 537-553, August.
    3. Giovanni S.F. Bruno & Floro E. Caroleo & Orietta Dessy, 2013. "Stepping stones versus dead end jobs: exits from temporary contracts in Italy after the 2003 reform," Rivista Internazionale di Scienze Sociali, Vita e Pensiero, Pubblicazioni dell'Universita' Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, vol. 121(1), pages 31-62.
    4. Floro Ernesto Caroleo & Francesco Pastore, 2009. "Le cause del(l') (in)successo lavorativo dei giovani," Economia & lavoro, Carocci editore, issue 3, pages 107-107.
    5. repec:tur:wpaper:6 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Fabio Berton & Francesco Devicienti & Lia Pacelli, 2011. "Are temporary jobs a port of entry into permanent employment?: Evidence from matched employer-employee," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 32(8), pages 879-899, November.
    7. Chalmers, J. & Kalb, G., 2000. "Are Casual Jobs a Freeway to Permanent Employment?," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 8/00, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:atlecj:v:27:y:1999:i:1:p:38-52. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.