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Why Is Insured Unemployment So Low?

Author

Listed:
  • Gary Burtless

    (Brookings Institution)

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Gary Burtless, 1983. "Why Is Insured Unemployment So Low?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 14(1), pages 225-254.
  • Handle: RePEc:bin:bpeajo:v:14:y:1983:i:1983-1:p:225-254
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    File URL: https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/1983/01/1983a_bpea_burtless_summers.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bryce Jones, 1991. "In aid of the unemployed," Forum for Social Economics, Springer;The Association for Social Economics, vol. 20(2), pages 16-32, March.
    2. Orley Ashenfelter & David Card, 1986. "Why Have Unemployment Rates in Canada and the U.S. Diverged?," Working Papers 584, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    3. Christopher J. O'Leary & Robert A. Straits, 2004. "Intergovernmental Relations in Employment Policy: The United States Experience," Book chapters authored by Upjohn Institute researchers, in: Alain Noel (ed.),Federalism and Labour market Policy: Comparing Different Governance and Employment Strategies, pages 25-82, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    4. Casey B. Mulligan, 2012. "Do Welfare Policies Matter for Labor Market Aggregates? Quantifying Safety Net Work Incentives since 2007," NBER Working Papers 18088, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Michael Baker & Samuel A. Rea, 1998. "Employment Spells And Unemployment Insurance Eligibility Requirements," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(1), pages 80-94, February.
    6. Julie Hotchkiss, 1999. "The effect of transitional employment on search duration: A selectivity approach," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 27(1), pages 38-52, March.
    7. Rebecca M. Blank & David E. Card, 1991. "Recent Trends in Insured and Uninsured Unemployment: Is There an Explanation?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(4), pages 1157-1189.
    8. Mukoyama, Toshihiko & Sahin, Aysegl, 2009. "Why did the average duration of unemployment become so much longer?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 200-209, March.
    9. Rebecca M. Blank & Alan S. Blinder, 1985. "Macroeconomics, Income Distribution, and Poverty," NBER Working Papers 1567, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Patricia M. Anderson & Bruce D. Meyer, 1994. "Unemployment Insurance Benefits and Takeup Rates," NBER Working Papers 4787, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Schmid, Gunther, 1995. "Institutional incentives to prevent unemployment: Unemployment insurance and active labor market policy in a comparative perspective," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 51-103.
    12. Gary Burtless, 1998. "Relative Unemployment in Canada and the United States: An Assessment," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 24(s1), pages 254-263, February.
    13. Christopher J. O'Leary & Stephen A. Wandner, 2001. "Unemployment Compensation and Older Workers," Book chapters authored by Upjohn Institute researchers, in: Peter P. Budetti & Richard V. Burkhauser & Janice M. Gregory & H. Allan Hunt (ed.), Ensuring Health and Income Security for an Aging Workforce, pages 85-133, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    14. Casey B. Mulligan, 2011. "The Expanding Social Safety Net," NBER Working Papers 17654, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. repec:mpr:mprres:1832 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Peter Hans Matthews & Ivan Kandilov & Bradford Maxwell, 2002. "Interstate differences in insured unemployment: some recent evidence," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(14), pages 945-948.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    macroeconomics; insured unemployment;

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