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Job Tenure and Joblessness of Displaced Workers

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  • Robert G. Valletta

Abstract

Selective search where unemployed job losers confine their job seeking efforts to matches in the pre-separation sector has attracted considerable attention as a possible source of high and persistent unemployment. However, this idea is questionable. ...

Suggested Citation

  • Robert G. Valletta, 1991. "Job Tenure and Joblessness of Displaced Workers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(4), pages 726-741.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:26:y:1991:i:4:p:726-741
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    Cited by:

    1. Julie Hotchkiss, 1999. "The effect of transitional employment on search duration: A selectivity approach," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 27(1), pages 38-52, March.
    2. David Neumark, 2003. "Age Discrimination Legislation in the United States," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 21(3), pages 297-317, July.
    3. Wiljan van den Berge, 2016. "How do severance pay and job search assistance jointly affect unemployment duration and job quality?," CPB Discussion Paper 334, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    4. Swaim, Paul & Podgursky, Michael, 1994. "Female Labor Supply Following Displacement: A Split-Population Model of Labor Force Participation and Job Search," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(4), pages 640-656, October.
    5. Janet Netz & Jon Haveman, 1999. "All In The Family: Family, Income, And Labor Force Attachment," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(3), pages 85-106.
    6. Idson, Todd L & Valletta, Robert G, 1996. "Seniority, Sectoral Decline, and Employee Retention: An Analysis of Layoff Unemployment Spells," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(4), pages 654-676, October.
    7. Alicia H. Munnell & Steven Sass & Mauricio Soto & Natalia Zhivan, 2006. "Has the Displacement of Older Workers Increased?," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2006-17, Center for Retirement Research, revised Sep 2006.

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