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Female Labor Supply Following Displacement: A Split-Population Model of Labor Force Participation and Job Search

Listed author(s):
  • Swaim, Paul
  • Podgursky, Michael

Following permanent layoffs, most women search for new jobs but some withdraw from the labor force. The authors develop a joint model of the choice to undertake postdisplacement job search and unemployment durations for searchers and estimate it using data from the 1988 Displaced Worker Survey. Maximum likelihood estimates of this 'split-population' model show that labor-force withdrawal is an important factor explaining the distribution of postdisplacement jobless spells. The model also allows the authors to distinguish the effect of any covariate on the decision to engage in postdisplacement search from its effect on search duration. Single-population models obscure this distinction. Copyright 1994 by University of Chicago Press.

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/298365
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Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 12 (1994)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 640-656

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:12:y:1994:i:4:p:640-56
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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  1. Fallick, B.C., 1989. "The Industrial Mobility Of Displaced Workers," Papers 1, California Los Angeles - Applied Econometrics.
  2. Ronald G. Ehrenberg & George H. Jakubson, 1988. "Advance Notice Provisions in Plant Closing Legislation: Do They Matter?," NBER Working Papers 2611, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Paul Swaim & Michael Podgursky, 1990. "Advance Notice and Job Search: The Value of an Early Start," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 25(2), pages 147-178.
  4. Douglas L. Kruse, 1988. "International Trade and the Labor Market Experience of Displaced Workers," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 41(3), pages 402-417, April.
  5. Valletta, R.G., 1990. "Job Tenure And Joblessness Of Displaced Workers," Papers 89-90-5, California Irvine - School of Social Sciences.
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