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Knocking on the door to the teaching profession? Modeling the entry of prospective teachers into the workforce

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  • Goldhaber, Dan
  • Krieg, John
  • Theobald, Roddy

Abstract

We use a unique longitudinal sample of student teachers (“interns”) from six Washington state teacher training institutions to investigate patterns of entry into the teaching workforce. We estimate split population models that simultaneously estimate the impact of individual characteristics and student teaching experiences on the timing and probability of initial hiring as a public school teacher. Not surprisingly, we find that interns endorsed to teach in “difficult-to-staff” areas are more likely to find employment as public school teachers than interns endorsed in other areas. Younger interns, white interns, and interns who completed their student teaching in suburban schools are also more likely to find a teaching job, all else equal. Prospective teachers who do their internships at schools that have more teacher turnover are more likely to find employment, often at those schools. On the other hand, few of the characteristics of an intern's cooperating teacher are predictive of workforce entry. Finally, interns with higher credential exam scores are more likely to be hired by the school where they did their student teaching.

Suggested Citation

  • Goldhaber, Dan & Krieg, John & Theobald, Roddy, 2014. "Knocking on the door to the teaching profession? Modeling the entry of prospective teachers into the workforce," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 106-124.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:43:y:2014:i:c:p:106-124
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2014.10.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Teacher labor markets; Student teaching; Teacher training; Teacher hiring;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J45 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Public Sector Labor Markets

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