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Value added of teachers in high-poverty schools and lower poverty schools

Author

Listed:
  • Sass, Tim R.
  • Hannaway, Jane
  • Xu, Zeyu
  • Figlio, David N.
  • Feng, Li

Abstract

Using student-level microdata from 2000–2001 to 2004–2005 from Florida and North Carolina, we compare the effectiveness of teachers in schools serving primarily students from low-income families (>70% free-and-reduced-price-lunch students) with teachers in schools serving more advantaged students. The results show that the average effectiveness of teachers in high poverty schools is in general less than teachers in other schools and there is significantly greater variation in teacher quality among high poverty schools. These differences are largely driven by less productive teachers at the bottom of the teacher effectiveness distribution in high-poverty schools. The bulk of the quality differential is due to differences in the unmeasured characteristics of teachers. We find that the gain in productivity to more experienced teachers from additional experience is much stronger in lower-poverty schools. The lower return to experience in high-poverty schools does not appear to be a result of differences in the quality of teachers who leave teaching or who switch schools, however. Our findings suggest that measures that induce highly effective teachers to move to high-poverty schools and which promote an environment in which teachers’ skills will improve over time are more likely to be successful.

Suggested Citation

  • Sass, Tim R. & Hannaway, Jane & Xu, Zeyu & Figlio, David N. & Feng, Li, 2012. "Value added of teachers in high-poverty schools and lower poverty schools," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 104-122.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:72:y:2012:i:2:p:104-122
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jue.2012.04.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hanushek, Eric A. & Rivkin, Steven G. & Schiman, Jeffrey C., 2016. "Dynamic effects of teacher turnover on the quality of instruction," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 132-148.
    2. repec:mpr:mprres:7949 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Cory Koedel & Jiaxi Li, 2016. "The Efficiency Implications Of Using Proportional Evaluations To Shape The Teaching Workforce," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 34(1), pages 47-62, January.
    4. Jennifer King Rice, 2013. "Learning from Experience? Evidence on the Impact and Distribution of Teacher Experience and the Implications for Teacher Policy," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 8(3), pages 332-348, July.
    5. repec:tpr:edfpol:v:12:y:2017:i:3:p:396-418 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Eric Isenberg & Jeffrey Max & Philip Gleason & Matthew Johnson & Jonah Deutsch & Michael Hansen, "undated". "Do Low-Income Students Have Equal Access to Effective Teachers? Evidence from 26 Districts (Final Report)," Mathematica Policy Research Reports ce9ae6b49ff34e388113f31ca, Mathematica Policy Research.
    7. Cory Koedel & Mark Ehlert & Eric Parsons & Michael Podgursky, 2012. "Selecting Growth Measures for School and Teacher Evaluations," Working Papers 1210, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.
    8. Jeffrey Max & Steven Glazerman, 2014. "Do Disadvantaged Students Get Less Effective Teaching? Key Findings from Recent Institute of Education Sciences Studies (Evaluation Brief)," Mathematica Policy Research Reports a7da30900bb047038d31acd56, Mathematica Policy Research.
    9. Maria D. Fitzpatrick & Michael F. Lovenheim, 2014. "Early Retirement Incentives and Student Achievement," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 6(3), pages 120-154, August.
    10. Kevin C. Bastian & Gary T. Henry & Charles L. Thompson, 2013. "Incorporating Access to More Effective Teachers into Assessments of Educational Resource Equity," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 8(4), pages 560-580, October.
    11. repec:mpr:mprres:7890 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. repec:mpr:mprres:7948 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Eric Isenberg & Jeffrey Max & Philip Gleason & Liz Potamites & Robert Santillano & Heinrich Hock & Michael Hansen, "undated". "Access to Effective Teaching for Disadvantaged Students (Interim Report)," Mathematica Policy Research Reports ad54d58020e54294b0ab88ad0, Mathematica Policy Research.
    14. Dougherty, Shaun M. & Goodman, Joshua S. & Hill, Darryl V. & Litke, Erica G. & Page, Lindsay C., 2017. "Objective course placement and college readiness: Evidence from targeted middle school math acceleration," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 141-161.
    15. Dougherty, Shaun & Goodman, Joshua & Hill, Darryl & Litke, Erica & Page, Lindsay C., 2015. "Early Math Coursework and College Readiness: Evidence from Targeted Middle School Math Acceleration," Working Paper Series rwp15-044, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    16. Heather Antecol & Ozkan Eren & Serkan Ozbeklik, 2016. "Peer Effects in Disadvantaged Primary Schools: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 51(1), pages 95-132.
    17. Steele, Jennifer L. & Pepper, Matthew J. & Springer, Matthew G. & Lockwood, J.R., 2015. "The distribution and mobility of effective teachers: Evidence from a large, urban school district," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 86-101.
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    20. repec:mpr:mprres:8000 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Eric Isenberg & Bing-ru Teh & Elias Walsh, 2013. "Elementary School Data Issues: Implications for Research Using Value-Added Models," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 7f1382d01d9a40d9b2aad7d09, Mathematica Policy Research.
    22. Cory Koedel & P. Brett Xiang, 2017. "Pension Enhancements and the Retention of Public Employees," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 70(2), pages 519-551, March.
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    24. Dalton, John & Leung, Tin Cheuk, 2015. "Being Bad by Being Good: Owner and Captain Value-Added in the Slave Trade," MPRA Paper 66865, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    25. Melissa A. Clark & Hanley S. Chiang & Tim Silva & Sheena McConnell & Kathy Sonnenfeld & Anastasia Erbe & Michael Puma, 2013. "The Effectiveness of Secondary Math Teachers from Teach For America and the Teaching Fellows Programs," Mathematica Policy Research Reports ad5192faecc9490288484de35, Mathematica Policy Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; Student achievement; Teacher quality; High-poverty schools;

    JEL classification:

    • I - Health, Education, and Welfare
    • J - Labor and Demographic Economics
    • R - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics

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