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Teachers and Student Achievement in the Chicago Public High Schools

  • Daniel Aaronson
  • Lisa Barrow
  • William Sander

We estimate the importance of teachers in Chicago public high schools using matched student-teacher administrative data. A one standard deviation, one semester improvement in math teacher quality raises student math scores by 0.13 grade equivalents or, over 1 year, roughly one-fifth of average yearly gains. Estimates are relatively stable over time, reasonably impervious to a variety of conditioning variables, and do not appear to be driven by classroom sorting or selective score reporting. Also, teacher quality is particularly important for lower-ability students. Finally, traditional human capital measures—including those determining compensation—explain little of the variation in estimated quality.

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File URL: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/resolve?id=doi:10.1086/508733
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Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 25 (2007)
Issue (Month): ()
Pages: 95-135

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:25:y:2007:p:95-135
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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