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Causal Effects in Education

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  • Dinand Webbink

Abstract

In recent years, a wave of new studies on the effects of educational interventions on student performance has emerged. The realization that inputs in the education process are endogenous is important for the validity of traditional findings. Because of ignoring endogeneity bias, all traditional estimates might be wrong. Recent studies exploit exogenous variation in interventions in education produced by controlled or natural experiments. Results generated by this methodological innovation differ substantially from the traditional findings. This article reviews this new literature, illustrates new methods for identifying causal effects of interventions in education and compares the findings with the traditional literature. Copyright Blackwell Publishers Ltd, 2005.

Suggested Citation

  • Dinand Webbink, 2005. "Causal Effects in Education," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(4), pages 535-560, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jecsur:v:19:y:2005:i:4:p:535-560
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Luis Miguel Doncel & Jorge Sainz & Ismael Sanz, 2012. "An Estimation of the Advantage of Charter over Public Schools," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(4), pages 442-463, November.
    2. De Paola, Maria & Scoppa, Vincenzo, 2009. "Effects of Class Size on Achievement of College Students," MPRA Paper 16945, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Dolores Messer & Stefan C. Wolter, 2009. "Money Matters - Evidence from a Large-Scale Randomized Field Experiment with Vouchers for Adult Training," CESifo Working Paper Series 2548, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Martin Schlotter & Guido Schwerdt & Ludger Woessmann, 2011. "Econometric methods for causal evaluation of education policies and practices: a non-technical guide," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(2), pages 109-137.
    5. Rivera, Luis & Rojas-Romagosa, Hugo, 2010. "Formación de capital humano y el vínculo entre comercio y pobreza: los casos de Costa Rica y Nicaragua," Documentos de Proyectos 3814, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    6. Andrea Asoni & Tino Sanandaji, 2016. "Identifying the effect of college education on business and employment survival," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 46(2), pages 311-324, February.
    7. Debra Shepherd, 2013. "A question of efficiency: decomposing South African reading test scores using PIRLS 2006," Working Papers 20/2013, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    8. repec:bla:obuest:v:79:y:2017:i:5:p:654-688 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Hoogerheide, Lennart & Block, Joern H. & Thurik, Roy, 2012. "Family background variables as instruments for education in income regressions: A Bayesian analysis," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 515-523.
    10. Joern H. Block & Lennart Hoogerheide & Roy Thurik, 2009. "Education and Entrepreneurial Choice: An Instrumental Variables Analysis," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 09-088/4, Tinbergen Institute, revised 23 Nov 2010.
    11. Mika Maliranta & Satu Nurmi & Hanna Virtanen, 2008. "It takes three to tango in employment: Matching vocational education organisations, students and companies in labour market," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0022, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    12. Joern H. Block & Lennart Hoogerheide & Roy Thurik, 2010. "Are Education and Entrepreneurial Income Endogenous and do Family Background Variables make Sense as Instruments? A Bayesian Analysis," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 10-024/4, Tinbergen Institute.
    13. Lawrence Kessler & Murat Munkin, 2015. "Bayesian estimation of panel data fractional response models with endogeneity: an application to standardized test rates," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 49(1), pages 81-114, August.
    14. repec:kap:jproda:v:49:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11123-017-0517-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Torberg Falch & Astrid Marie Jorde Sandsør & Bjarne Strøm, 2017. "Do Smaller Classes Always Improve Students’ Long-run Outcomes?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 79(5), pages 654-688, October.
    16. Van Klaveren, C. & De Wolf, I., 2013. "Systematic Reviews In Education Research: When Do Effect Studies Provide Evidence?," Working Papers 46, Top Institute for Evidence Based Education Research.
    17. Han, Kwideok & Whitacre, Brian E., 2018. "Student Performance and School Size: A Two-stage Spatial Quantile Regression Approach to Evaluate Oklahoma High Schools," 2018 Annual Meeting, February 2-6, 2018, Jacksonville, Florida 266597, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.

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