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Home versus School Learning: A New Approach to Estimating the Effect of Class Size on Achievement

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  • Mikael Lindahl

Abstract

The effects of class size on scholastic achievement are estimated using a seasonal feature of the school system. The fact that schools are in session during the school year and out of session during the summer makes it possible to control for non-school influences on both the level of and changes in achievement. Using Swedish data, smaller classes are found to generate higher test scores and this effect is larger for immigrants. The results are also compared with those from applying the same data to the widely used value-added model. Copyright The editors of the "Scandinavian Journal of Economics", 2005 .

Suggested Citation

  • Mikael Lindahl, 2005. "Home versus School Learning: A New Approach to Estimating the Effect of Class Size on Achievement," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 107(2), pages 375-394, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scandj:v:107:y:2005:i:2:p:375-394
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    Cited by:

    1. Andersson, Christian, 2007. "Teacher density and student achievement in Swedish compulsory schools," Working Paper Series 2007:4, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    2. repec:bla:obuest:v:79:y:2017:i:5:p:654-688 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Peter Fredriksson & Björn Öckert & Hessel Oosterbeek, 2013. "Long-Term Effects of Class Size," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(1), pages 249-285.
    4. Hinnerich, Björn Tyrefors & Vlachos, Jonas, 2017. "The impact of upper-secondary voucher school attendance on student achievement. Swedish evidence using external and internal evaluations," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 1-14.
    5. Hægeland, Torbjørn & Raaum, Oddbjørn & Salvanes, Kjell G., 2012. "Pennies from heaven? Using exogenous tax variation to identify effects of school resources on pupil achievement," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 601-614.
    6. Nordblom, K., 2001. "Within-the-Family Education and Its Impact on Equality," Papers 2001:06, Uppsala - Working Paper Series.
    7. Hideo Akabayashi & Ryosuke Nakamura, 2014. "Can Small Class Policy Close the Gap? An Empirical Analysis of Class Size Effects in Japan," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 65(3), pages 253-281, September.
    8. Peter Fredriksson & Björn Öckert, 2008. "Resources and Student Achievement-Evidence from a Swedish Policy Reform," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 110(2), pages 277-296, June.
    9. Lindahl, Mikael, 2001. "Summer Learning and the Effect of Schooling: Evidence from Sweden," IZA Discussion Papers 262, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Christopher Jepsen, 2015. "Class size: Does it matter for student achievement?," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 190-190, September.
    11. Ludger Wößmann, 2003. "European education production functions: what makes a difference for student achievement in Europe?," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 190, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    12. Hideo Akabayashi & Ryosuke Nakamura, 2012. "Can Small Class Policy Close The Gap? An Empirical Analysis Of Class Size Effects In Japan," Working Papers e51, Tokyo Center for Economic Research.
    13. Edwin Leuven & Hessel Oosterbeek & Marte Rønning, 2008. "Quasi-experimental Estimates of the Effect of Class Size on Achievement in Norway," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 110(4), pages 663-693, December.
    14. Stephen Gibbons & Sandra McNally, 2013. "The Effects of Resources Across School Phases: A Summary of Recent Evidence," CEP Discussion Papers dp1226, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education

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