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The Effects of Resources Across School Phases: A Summary of Recent Evidence

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  • Stephen Gibbons
  • Sandra McNally

Abstract

This report provides an overview and discussion of the past decade of academic evidence on the causal effects of resources in schooling on students' outcomes. Early evidence lacked good strategies for estimating the effects of schools resources, leading many people to conclude that spending more on schools had no effect. More recent evidence using better research designs finds that resources do matter, but the range of estimates of the impacts is quite wide. The review devotes special attention to differences across the early years, primary and secondary phases. Theoretical work has indicated that interventions early in a child's life may be more productive than interventions later on. However, although there are more examples of good quality studies on primary schooling, the existing body of empirical work does not lead to a conclusive case in favour of early interventions.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Gibbons & Sandra McNally, 2013. "The Effects of Resources Across School Phases: A Summary of Recent Evidence," CEP Discussion Papers dp1226, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp1226
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    Cited by:

    1. Miquel Pellicer & Patrizio Piraino, 2015. "The effect of non-personnel resources on educational outcomes: Evidence from South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 144, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    2. repec:oup:jeurec:v:15:y:2017:i:4:p:746-783. is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    education; school resources; government policy; pupil premium; education funding; inequality; OECD;

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