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School inputs and skills: Complementarity and self-productivity

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  • Cheti Nicoletti
  • Birgitta Rabe

Abstract

Using administrative data on schools in England, we estimate an education production model of cognitive skills at the end of secondary school. We provide empirical evidence of self-productivity of skills and of complementarity between secondary school inputs and skills at the end of primary school. Our inference relies on idiosyncratic variation in school expenditure and child fixed effect estimation that controls for the endogeneity of past skills. The persistence in cognitive ability is 0.22 and the return to school expenditure is three times higher for students at the top of the past attainment distribution than for those at the bottom.

Suggested Citation

  • Cheti Nicoletti & Birgitta Rabe, 2013. "School inputs and skills: Complementarity and self-productivity," Discussion Papers 13/30, Department of Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:yor:yorken:13/30
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:labeco:v:47:y:2017:i:c:p:15-34 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Huebener, Mathias & Kuger, Susanne & Marcus, Jan, 2017. "Increased instruction hours and the widening gap in student performance," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 15-34.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education production function; test scores; school quality; complementarity;

    JEL classification:

    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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