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Sibling Spillover Effects in School Achievement

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  • Nicoletti, Cheti

    (University of York)

  • Rabe, Birgitta

    (ISER, University of Essex)

Abstract

We provide the first empirical evidence on direct sibling spillover effects in school achievement using English administrative data. Our identification strategy exploits the variation in school test scores across three subjects observed at age 11 and 16 and the variation in the composition of school mates between siblings. These two sources of variation have been separately used to identify school peer effects, but never in combination. By combining them we are able to identify a sibling spillover effect that is net of unobserved child, family and school characteristics shared by siblings. We find a modest spillover effect from the older sibling to the younger but not vice versa. This effect is considerably higher for siblings from deprived backgrounds, where sibling sharing of school knowledge might compensate for the lack of parental information.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicoletti, Cheti & Rabe, Birgitta, 2014. "Sibling Spillover Effects in School Achievement," IZA Discussion Papers 8615, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8615
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    Cited by:

    1. Cheti Nicoletti & Kjell Salvanes & Emma Tominey, 2020. "Mothers working during preschool years and child skills. Does income compensate?," CEPEO Working Paper Series 20-08, Centre for Education Policy and Equalising Opportunities, UCL Institute of Education, revised Mar 2020.
    2. Jacob, Arun, 2016. "Gender Bias in Educational Attainment in India : The Role of Dowry Payments," MPRA Paper 76338, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Marchenko, Maria, 2019. "Endogenous Shocks in Social Networks: Exam Failures and Friends' Future Performance," Department of Economics Working Paper Series 292, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    4. Ainhoa Aparicio-Fenoll & Veruska Oppedisano, 2016. "Should I stay or should I go? Sibling effects in household formation," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 1007-1027, December.
    5. Costanza Biavaschi & Corrado Giulietti & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2015. "Sibling Influence on the Human Capital of the Left-Behind," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(4), pages 403-438.
    6. Peter, Noemi & Lundborg, Petter & Mikkelsen, Sara & Webbink, Dinand, 2018. "The effect of a sibling’s gender on earnings and family formation," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 61-78.
    7. Peter, Noemi & Lundborg, Petter & Webbink, Dinand, 2015. "The Effect of a Sibling's Gender on Earnings, Education and Family Formation," IZA Discussion Papers 9128, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Gordon B. Dahl & Dan-Olof Rooth & Anders Stenberg, 2020. "Intergenerational and Sibling Peer Effects in High School Majors," NBER Working Papers 27618, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Crudu, Federico & Neri, Laura & Tiezzi, Silvia, 2021. "Family ties and child obesity in Italy," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 40(C).
    10. Mariel Bedoya & Bruno Gonzaga & Alejandro Herrera Jiménez & Karen Espinoza, 2019. "Setting an example? Spillover effects of Peruvian Magnet Schools," Development Research Working Paper Series 01/2019, Institute for Advanced Development Studies.
    11. Maria Marchenko, 2019. "Dealing with Endogenous Shocks in Dynamic Friendship Network," Department of Economics Working Papers wuwp291, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Department of Economics.

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    Keywords

    family effects; peer effects; social interaction; education;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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