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Educational scores: How does Russia fare?

  • Amini, Chiara
  • Commander, Simon
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    This paper uses large multi-country datasets on educational scores – namely PISA and TIMSS – to examine the factors associated with educational outcomes. In particular, it distinguishes between individual and family background factors and those emanating from the school or institutional environment. Using pooled data as well as cross sectional evidence we look at the variation across countries before looking at within country variation in Russia. We find that both in the benchmark cross-country estimates, as also those using just Russia data, a number of individual and family variables are robustly associated with better educational outcomes. Institutional variables also matter – notably student–teacher ratios and indicators of school autonomy – but there are also some clear particularities in the Russian case.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0147596712000212
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Comparative Economics.

    Volume (Year): 40 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 508-527

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jcecon:v:40:y:2012:i:3:p:508-527
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622864

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    12. Dan D. Goldhaber & Dominic J. Brewer, 1997. "Why Don't Schools and Teachers Seem to Matter? Assessing the Impact of Unobservables on Educational Productivity," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 32(3), pages 505-523.
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